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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

case of this kind is that of Alexander the Great, who, according 

to Plutarch, exhaled so sweet an odor that his tunics were soaked 

with aromatic perfume (_Convivalium Disputationum_, lib. I, 

quest. 6). Malherbe, Cujas, and Haller are said to have diffused 

a musky odor. The agreeable odor of Walt Whitman has been 

remarked by Kennedy and others. The perfume exhaled by many holy 

men and women, so often noted by ancient writers (discussed by 

Goerres in the second volume of his _Christliche Mystik_) and 

which has entered into current phraseology as a merely 

metaphorical "odor of sanctity," was doubtless due, as Hammond 

first pointed out, to abnormal nervous conditions, for it is well 

known that such conditions affect the odor, and in insanity, for 

instance, the presence is noted of bodily odors which have 

sometimes even been considered of diagnostic importance. J.B. 

Friedreich, _Allgemeine Diagnostik der Psychischen Krankheiten_, 

second edition, 1832, pp. 9-10, quotes passages from various 

authors on this point, which he accepts; various writers of more 

recent date have made similar observations. 

 

The odor of sanctity was specially noted at death, and was 

doubtless confused with the _odor mortis_, which frequently 

precedes death and by some is regarded as an almost certain 

indication of its approach. In the _British Medical Journal_, for 

May and June, 1898, will be found letters from several 

correspondents substantiating this point. One of these 

correspondents (Dr. Tuckey, of Tywardwreath, Cornwall) mentions 

that he has in Cornwall often seen ravens flying over houses in 

which persons lay dying, evidently attracted by a characteristic 

odor. 

 

It must be borne in mind, however, that, while every person has, to a 

sensitive nose, a distinguishing odor, we must regard that odor either as 

but one of the various sensations given off by the body, or else as a 

combination of two or more of these emanations. The body in reality gives 

off a number of different odors. The most important of these are: (1) the 

general skin odor, a faint, but agreeable, fragrance often to be detected 

on the skin even immediately after washing; (2) the smell of the hair and 

scalp; (3) the odor of the breath; (4) the odor of the armpit; (5) the 

odor of the feet; (6) the perineal odor; (7) in men the odor of the 

preputial smegma; (8) in women the odor of the mons veneris, that of 

vulvar smegma, that of vaginal mucus, and the menstrual odor. All these 

are odors which may usually be detected, though sometimes only in a very 

faint degree, in healthy and well-washed persons under normal conditions. 

It is unnecessary here to take into account the special odors of various 

secretions and excretions.[35] 

 

It is a significant fact, both as regards the ancestral sexual connections 

of the body odors and their actual sexual associations to-day, that, as 


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