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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

It is certain also that a great many neurasthenic people, and 

particularly those who are sexually neurasthenic, are peculiarly 

susceptible to olfactory influences. A number of eminent poets and 

novelists--especially, it would appear, in France--seem to be in this 

case. Baudelaire, of all great poets, has most persistently and most 

elaborately emphasized the imaginative and emotional significance of odor; 

the _Fleurs du Mal_ and many of the _Petits Poemes en Prose_ are, from 

this point of view, of great interest. There can be no doubt that in 

Baudelaire's own imaginative and emotional life the sense of smell played 

a highly important part; and that, in his own words, odor was to him what 

music is to others. Throughout Zola's novels--and perhaps more especially 

in _La Faute de l'Abbe Mouret_--there is an extreme insistence on odors of 

every kind. Prof. Leopold Bernard wrote an elaborate study of this aspect 

of Zola's work[44]; he believed that underlying Zola's interest in odors 

there was an abnormally keen olfactory sensibility and large development 

of the olfactory region of the brain. Such a supposition is, however, 

unnecessary, and, as a matter of fact, a careful examination of Zola's 

olfactory sensibility, conducted by M. Passy, showed that it was somewhat 

below normal.[45] At the same time it was shown that Zola was really a 

person of olfactory psychic type, with a special attention to odors and a 

special memory for them; as is frequently the case with perfumers with 

less than normal olfactory acuity he possessed a more than normal power of 

discriminating odors; it is possible that in early life his olfactory 

acuity may also have been above normal. In the same way Nietzsche, in his 

writings, shows a marked sensibility, and especially antipathy, as regards 

odors, which has by some been regarded as an index to a real physical 

sensibility of abnormal keenness; according to Moebius, however, there was 

no reason for supposing this to be the case.[46] Huysmans, who throughout 

his books reveals a very intense preoccupation with the exact shades of 

many kinds of sensory impressions, and an apparently abnormally keen 

sensibility to them, has shown a great interest in odors, more especially 

in an oft-quoted passage in _A Rebours_. The blind Milton of "Paradise 

Lost" (as the late Mr. Grant Allen once remarked to me), dwells much on 

scents; in this case it is doubtless to the blindness and not to any 

special organic predisposition that we must attribute this direction of 

sensory attention.[47] Among our older English poets, also, Herrick 

displays a special interest in odors with a definite realization of their 

sexual attractiveness.[48] Shelley, who was alive to so many of the 

unusual aesthetic aspects of things, often shows an enthusiastic delight in 

odors, more especially those of flowers. It may, indeed, be said that most 

poets--though to a less degree than those I have mentioned--devote a 

special attention to odors, and, since it has been possible to describe 


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