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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

smell as the sense of imagination, this need not surprise us. That 

Shakespeare, for instance, ranked this sense very high indeed is shown by 

various passages in his works and notably by Sonnet LIV: "O, how much more 

doth beauty beauteous seem?"--in which he implicitly places the attraction 

of odor on at least as high a level as that of vision.[49] 

 

A neurasthenic sensitiveness to odors, specially sexual odors, is 

frequently accompanied by lack of sexual vigor. In this way we may account 

for the numerous cases in which old men in whom sexual desire survives the 

loss of virile powers--probably somewhat abnormal persons at the 

outset--find satisfaction in sexual odors. Here, also, we have the basis 

for olfactory fetichism. In such fetichism the odor of the woman alone, 

whoever she may be and however unattractive she may be, suffices to 

furnish complete sexual satisfaction. In many, although not all, of those 

cases in which articles of women's clothing become the object of 

fetichistic attraction, there is certainly an olfactory element due to the 

personal odor attaching to the garments.[50] 

 

Olfactory influences play a certain part in various sexually 

abnormal tendencies and practices which do not proceed from an 

exclusively olfactory fascination. Thus, _cunnilingus_ and 

_fellatio_ derive part of their attraction, more especially in 

some individuals, from a predilection for the odors of the sexual 

parts. (See, e.g., Moll, _Untersuchungen ueber die Libido 

Sexualis_, bd. 1, p. 134.) In many cases smell plays no part in 

the attraction; "I enjoy _cunnilingus_, if I like the girl very 

much," a correspondent writes, "_in spite_ of the smell." We may 

associate this impulse with the prevalence of these practices 

among sexual inverts, in whom olfactory attractions are often 

specially marked. Those individuals, also, who are sexually 

affected by the urinary and alvine excretions ("_renifleurs_," 

"_stereoraires_," etc.) are largely, though not necessarily 

altogether, moved by olfactory impressions. The attraction was, 

however, exclusively olfactory in the case of the young woman 

recorded by Moraglia (_Archivio di Psichiatria_, 1892, p. 267), 

who was irresistibly excited by the odor of the fermented urine 

of men, and possibly also in the case narrated to Moraglia by 

Prof. L. Bianchi (ib. p. 568), in which a wife required flatus 

from her husband. 

 

The sexual pleasure derived from partial strangulation (discussed 

in the study of "Love and Pain" in a previous volume) may be 

associated with heightened olfactory sexual excitation. Dr. 

Kiernan, who points this out to me, has investigated a few 

neuropathic patients who like to have their necks squeezed, as 

they express it, and finds that in the majority the olfactory 

sensibility is thus intensified. 

 

Even in ordinary normal persons, however, there can be no doubt that 


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