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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

personal odor tends to play a not inconsiderable part in sexual 

attractions and sexual repulsions. As a sexual excitant, indeed, it comes 

far behind the stimuli received through the sense of sight. The 

comparative bluntness of the sense of smell in man makes it difficult for 

olfactory influence to be felt, as a rule, until the preliminaries of 

courtship are already over; so that it is impossible for smell ever to 

possess the same significance in sexual attraction in man that it 

possesses in the lower animals. With that reservation there can be no 

doubt that odor has a certain favorable or unfavorable influence in sexual 

relationships in all human races from the lowest to the highest. The 

Polynesian spoke with contempt of those women of European race who "have 

no smell," and in view of the pronounced personal odor of so many savage 

peoples as well as of the careful attention which they so often pay to 

odors, we may certainly assume, even in the absence of much definite 

evidence, that smell counts for much in their sexual relationships. This 

is confirmed by such practices as that found among some primitive 

peoples--as, it is stated, in the Philippines--of lovers exchanging their 

garments to have the smell of the loved one about them. In the barbaric 

stages of society this element becomes self-conscious and is clearly 

avowed; personal odors are constantly described with complacency, 

sometimes as mingled with the lavish use of artificial perfumes, in much 

of the erotic literature produced in the highest stages of barbarism, 

especially by Eastern peoples living in hot climates; it is only necessary 

to refer to the _Song of Songs_, the _Arabian Nights_, and the Indian 

treatises on love. Even in some parts of Europe the same influence is 

recognized in the crudest animal form, and Krauss states that among the 

Southern Slavs it is sometimes customary to leave the sexual parts 

unwashed because a strong odor of these parts is regarded as a sexual 

stimulant. Under the usual conditions of life in Europe personal odor has 

sunk into the background; this has been so equally under the conditions of 

classic, mediaeval, and modern life. Personal odor has been generally 

regarded as unaesthetic; it has, for the most part, only been mentioned to 

be reprobated, and even those poets and others who during recent centuries 

have shown a sensitive delight and interest in odors--Herrick, Shelley, 

Baudelaire, Zola, and Huysmans--have seldom ventured to insist that a 

purely natural and personal odor can be agreeable. The fact that it may be 

so, and that for most people such odors cannot be a matter of indifference 

in the most intimate of all relationships, is usually only to be learned 

casually and incidentally. There can be no doubt, however, that, as 

Kiernan points out, the extent to which olfaction influences the sexual 

sphere in civilized man has been much underestimated. We need not, 


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