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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

therefore, be surprised at the greater interest which has recently been 

taken in this subject. As usually happens, indeed, there has been in some 

writers a tendency to run to the opposite extreme, and we cannot, with 

Gustav Jaeger, regard the sexual instinct as mainly or altogether an 

olfactory matter. 

 

Of the Padmini, the perfect woman, the "lotus woman," Hindu 

writers say that "her sweat has the odor of musk," while the 

vulgar woman, they say, smells of fish (_Kama Sutra of 

Vatsyayana_). Ploss and Bartels (_Das Weib_, 1901, p. 218) bring 

forward a passage from the Tamil _Kokkogam_, minutely describing 

various kinds of sexual odor in women, which they regard as 

resting on sound observation. 

 

Four things in a woman, says the Arab, should be perfumed: the 

mouth, the armpits, the pudenda, and the nose. The Persian poets, 

in describing the body, delighted to use metaphors involving 

odor. Not only the hair and the down on the face, but the chin, 

the mouth, the beauty spots, the neck, all suggested odorous 

images. The epithets applied to the hair frequently refer to 

musk, ambergris, and civet. (_Anis El-Ochchaq_ translated by 

Huart, _Bibliotheque de l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes_, fasc. 25, 

1875.) 

 

The Hebrew _Song of Songs_ furnishes a typical example of a very 

beautiful Eastern love-poem in which the importance of the appeal 

to the sense of smell is throughout emphasized. There are in this 

short poem as many as twenty-four fairly definite references to 

odors,--personal odors, perfumes, and flowers,--while numerous 

other references to flowers, etc., seem to point to olfactory 

associations. Both the lover and his sweetheart express pleasure 

in each other's personal odor. 

 

"My beloved is unto me," she sings, "as a bag of myrrh 

That lieth between my breasts; 

My beloved is unto me as a cluster of henna flowers 

In the vineyard of En-gedi." 

 

And again: "His cheeks are as a bed of spices [or balsam], as 

banks of sweet herbs." While of her he says: "The smell of thy 

breath [or nose] is like apples." 

 

 

Greek and Roman antiquity, which has so largely influenced the 

traditions of modern Europe, was lavish in the use of perfumes, 

but showed no sympathy with personal odors. For the Roman 

satirists, like Martial, a personal odor is nearly always an 

unpleasant odor, though, there are a few allusions in classic 

literature recognizing bodily smell as a sexual attraction. Ovid, 

in his _Ars Amandi_ (Book III), says it is scarcely necessary to 

remind a lady that she must not keep a goat in her armpits: "_ne 

trux caper iret in alas_." "_Mulier tum bene olet ubi nihil 

olet_" is an ancient dictum, and in the sixteenth century 

Montaigne still repeated the same saying with complete approval. 

 

A different current of feeling began to appear with the new 


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