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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

emotional movement during the eighteenth century. Rousseau called 

attention to the importance of the olfactory sense, and in his 

educational work, _Emile_ (Bk. II), he referred to the odor of a 

woman's "_cabinet de toilette_" as not so feeble a snare as is 

commonly supposed. In the same century Casanova wrote still more 

emphatically concerning the same point; in the preface to his 

_Memoires_ he states: "I have always found sweet the odor of the 

women I have loved"; and elsewhere: "There is something in the 

air of the bedroom of the woman one loves, something so intimate, 

so balsamic, such voluptuous emanations, that if a lover had to 

choose between Heaven and this place of delight his hesitation 

would not last for a moment" (_Memoires_, vol. iii). In the 

previous century, in England, Sir Kenelm Digby, in his 

interesting and remarkable _Private Memoirs_, when describing a 

visit to Lady Venetia Stanley, afterward his wife, touches on 

personal odor as an element of attraction; he had found her 

asleep in bed and on her breasts "did glisten a few drops of 

sweatlike diamond sparks, and had a more fragrant odor than the 

violets or primroses whose season was newly passed." 

 

In 1821 Cadet-Devaux published, in the _Revue Encyclopedique_, a 

study entitled "De l'atmosphere de la Femme et de sa Puissance," 

which attracted a great deal of attention in Germany as well as 

in France; he considered that the exhalations of the feminine 

body are of the first importance in sexual attraction. 

 

Prof. A. Galopin in 1886 wrote a semiscientific book, _Le Parfum 

de la Femme_, in which the sexual significance of personal odor 

is developed to its fullest. He writes with enthusiasm concerning 

the sweet and health-giving character of the natural perfume of a 

beloved woman, and the mischief done both to health and love by 

the use of artificial perfumes. "The purest marriage that can be 

contracted between a man and a woman," he asserts (p. 157) "is 

that engendered by olfaction and sanctioned by a common 

assimilation in the brain of the animated molecules due to the 

secretion and evaporation of two bodies in contact and sympathy." 

 

In a book written during the first half of the nineteenth century 

which contains various subtle observations on love we read, with 

reference to the sweet odor which poets have found in the breath 

of women: "In reality many women have an intoxicatingly agreeable 

breath which plays no small part in the love-compelling 

atmosphere which they spread around them" (_Eros oder Woerterbuch 

ueber die Physiologie_, 1849, Bd. 1, p. 45). 

 

Most of the writers on the psychology of love at this period, 

however, seem to have passed over the olfactory element in sexual 

attraction, regarding it probably as too unaesthetic. It receives 


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