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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

poets that we may find the idea more directly and naturally 

expressed. Thus, in a Chinese drama ("The Transmigration of 

Yo-Chow," _Mercure de France_, No. 8, 1901) we find a learned 

young doctor addressing the following poem to his betrothed:-- 

 

"When I have climbed to the bushy summit of Mount Chao, 

I have still not reached to the level of your odorous armpit. 

I must needs mount to the sky 

Before the breeze brings to me 

The perfume of that embalsamed nest!" 

 

This poet seems, however, to have been carried to a pitch of 

enthusiasm unusual even in China, for his future mother-in-law, 

after expressing her admiration for the poem, remarks: "But who 

would have thought one could find so many beautiful things under 

my daughter's armpit!" 

 

The odor of the armpit is the most powerful in the body, 

sufficiently powerful to act as a muscular stimulant even in the 

absence of any direct sexual association. This is indicated by an 

observation made by Fere, who noticed, when living opposite a 

laundry, that an old woman who worked near the window would, 

toward the close of the day, introduce her right hand under the 

sleeve of the other to the armpit and then hold it to her nose; 

this she would do about every five minutes. It was evident that 

the odor acted as a stimulant to her failing energies. Fere has 

been informed by others who have had occasion to frequent 

workrooms that this proceeding is by no means uncommon among 

persons of both sexes. (Fere, _L'Instinct Sexuel_, second 

edition, p. 135.) I have myself noticed the same gesture very 

deliberately made in the street by a young English woman of the 

working class, under circumstances which suggested that it acted 

as an immediate stimulant in fatigue. 

 

Huysmans--who in his novels has insisted on odors, both those of 

a personal kind and perfumes, with great precision--has devoted 

one of the sketches, "Le Gousset," in his _Croquis Parisiens_ 

(1880) to the varying odors of women's armpits. "I have followed 

this fragrance in the country," he remarks, "behind a group of 

women gleaners under the bright sun. It was excessive and 

terrible; it stung your nostrils like an unstoppered bottle of 

alkali; it seized you, irritating your mucous membrane with a 

rough odor which had in it something of the relish of wild duck 

cooked with olives and the sharp odor of the shallot. On the 

whole, it was not a vile or repugnant emanation; it united, as an 

anticipated thing, with the formidable odors of the landscape; it 

was the pure note, completing with the human animals' cry of heat 

the odorous melody of beasts and woods." He goes on to speak of 

the perfume of feminine arms in the ball-room. "There the aroma 

is of ammoniated valerian, of chlorinated urine, brutally 


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