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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

visual experiences. Sight is our most intellectual sense, and we trust 

ourselves to it with comparative boldness without any undue dread that its 

messages will hurt us by their personal intimacy; we even court its 

experiences, for it is the chief organ of our curiosity, as smell is of a 

dog's. But smell with us has ceased to be a leading channel of 

intellectual curiosity. Personal odors do not, as vision does, give us 

information that is very largely intellectual; they make an appeal that is 

mainly of an intimate, emotional, imaginative character. They thus tend, 

when we are in our normal condition, to arouse what James calls the 

antisexual instinct. 

 

"I cannot understand how people do not see how the senses are 

connected," said Jenny Lind to J.A. Symonds (Horatio Brown, _J.A. 

Symonds_, vol. i, p. 207). "What I have suffered from my sense of 

smell! My youth was misery from my acuteness of sensibility." 

 

Mantegazza discusses the strength of olfactory antipathies 

(_Fisiologia dell' Odio_, p. 101), and mentions that once when 

ill in Paraguay he was nursed by an Indian girl of 16, who was 

fresh as a peach and extremely clean, but whose odor--"a mixture 

of wild beast's lair and decayed onions"--caused nausea and 

almost made him faint. 

 

Moll (_Untersuchungen ueber die Libido Sexualis_, bd. i, p. 135) 

records the case of a neuropathic man who was constantly rendered 

impotent by his antipathy to personal body odors. It had very 

frequently happened to him to be attracted by the face and 

appearance of a girl, but at the last moment potency was 

inhibited by the perception of personal odor. 

 

In the case of a man of distinguished ability known to me, 

belonging to a somewhat neuropathic family, there is extreme 

sensitiveness to the smell of a woman, which is frequently the 

most obvious thing to him about her. He has seldom known a woman 

whose natural perfume entirely suits him, and his olfactory 

impressions have frequently been the immediate cause of a rupture 

of relationships. 

 

It was formerly discussed whether strong personal odor 

constituted adequate ground for divorce. Hagen, who brings 

forward references on this point (_Sexuelle Osphresiologie_, pp. 

75-83), considers that the body odors are normally and naturally 

repulsive because they are closely associated with the capryl 

group of odors, which are those of many of the excretions. 

 

Olfactory antipathies are, however, often strictly subordinated 

to the individual's general emotional attitude toward the object 

from which they emanate. This is illustrated in the case, known 

to me, of a man who on a hot day entering a steamboat with a 

woman to whom he was attached seated himself between her and a 

man, a stranger. He soon became conscious of an axillary odor 

which he concluded to come from the man and which he felt as 


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