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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

disagreeable. But a little later he realized that it proceeded 

from his own companion, and with this discovery the odor at once 

lost its disagreeable character. 

 

In this respect a personal odor resembles a personal touch. Two 

intimate touches of the hand, though of precisely similar 

physical quality, may in their emotional effects be separated by 

an immeasurable interval, in dependence on our attitude toward 

the person from whom they proceed. 

 

Personal odor, in order to make its allurement felt, and not to arouse 

antipathy, must, in normal persons, have been preceded by conditions which 

have inhibited the play of the antisexual instinct. A certain degree of 

tumescence must already have been attained. It is even possible, when we 

bear in mind the intimate sympathy between the sexual sphere and the nose, 

that the olfactory organ needs to have its sensibility modified in a form 

receptive to sexual messages, though such an assumption is by no means 

necessary. It is when such a faint preliminary degree of tumescence has 

been attained, however it may have been attained,--for the methods of 

tumescence, as we know, are innumerable,--that a sympathetic personal odor 

is enabled to make its appeal. If we analyze the cases in which olfactory 

perceptions have proved potent in love, we shall nearly always find that 

they have been experienced under circumstances favorable for the 

occurrence of tumescence. When this is not the case we may reasonably 

suspect the presence of some degree of perversion. 

 

In the oft-quoted case of the Austrian peasant who found that he 

was aided in seducing young women by dancing with them and then 

wiping their faces with a handkerchief he had kept in his armpit, 

we may doubtless regard the preliminary excitement of the dance 

as an essential factor in the influence produced. 

 

In the same way, I am acquainted with the ease of a lady not 

usually sensitive to simple body odors (though affected by 

perfumes and flowers) who on one occasion, when already in a 

state of sexual erethism, was highly excited when perceiving the 

odor of her lover's axilla. 

 

The same influence of preliminary excitement may be seen in 

another instance known to me, that of a gentlemen who when 

traveling abroad fell in with three charming young ladies during 

a long railway journey. He was conscious of a pleasurable 

excitement caused by the prolonged intimacy of the journey, but 

this only became definitely sexual when the youngest of the 

ladies, stretching before him to look out of the window and 

holding on to the rack above, accidentally brought her axilla 

into close proximity with his face, whereupon erection was 

caused, although he himself regards personal odors, at all events 

when emanating from strangers, as indifferent or repulsive. 

 

A medical correspondent, referring to the fact that with many men 


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