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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

(indeed women also) sexual excitement occurs after dancing for a 

considerable time, remarks that he considers the odor of the 

woman's sweat is here a considerable factor. 

 

The characteristics of olfaction which our investigation has so far 

revealed have not, on the whole, been favorable to the influence of 

personal odors as a sexual attraction in civilized men. It is a primitive 

sense which had its flowering time before men arose; it is a comparatively 

unaesthetic sense; it is a somewhat obtuse sense which among Europeans is 

usually incapable of perceiving the odor of the "human flower"--to use 

Goethe's phrase--except on very close contact, and on this account, and on 

account of the fact that it is a predominantly emotional sense, personal 

odors in ordinary social intercourse are less likely to arouse the sexual 

instinct than the antisexual instinct. If a certain degree of tumescence 

is required before a personal odor can exert an attractive influence, a 

powerful personal odor, strong enough to be perceived before any degree of 

tumescence is attained, will tend to cause repulsion, and in so doing 

tend, consciously or unconsciously, to excite prejudice against personal 

odor altogether. This is actually the case in civilization, and most 

people, it would appear, view with more or less antipathy the personal 

odors of those persons to whom they are not sexually attracted, while 

their attitude is neutral in this respect toward the individuals to whom 

they are sexually attracted.[51] The following statement by a 

correspondent seems to me to express the experience of the majority of men 

in this respect: "I do not notice that different people have different 

smells. Certain women I have known have been in the habit of using 

particular scents, but no associations could be aroused if I were to smell 

the same scent now, for I should not identify it. As a boy I was very fond 

of scent, and I associate this with my marked sexual proclivities. I like 

a woman to use a little scent. It rouses my sexual feelings, but not to 

any large extent. I dislike the smell of a woman's vagina." While the last 

statement seems to express the feeling of many if not most men, it may be 

proper to add that there seems no natural reason why the vulvar odor of a 

clean and healthy woman should be other than agreeable to a normal man who 

is her lover. 


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