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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

 

In literature it is the natural odor of women rather than men which 

receives attention. We should expect this to be the case since literature 

is chiefly produced by men. The question as to whether men or women are 

really more apt to be sexually influenced in this way cannot thus be 

decided. Among animals, it seems probable, both sexes are alike influenced 

by odors, for, while it is usually the male whose sexual regions are 

furnished with special scent glands, when such occur, the peculiar odor of 

the female during the sexual season is certainly not less efficacious as 

an allurement to the male. If we compare the general susceptibility of men 

and women to agreeable odors, apart from the question of sexual 

allurement, there can be little doubt that it is most marked among women. 

As Groos points out, even among children little girls are more interested 

in scents than boys, and the investigations of various workers, especially 

Garbini, have shown that there is actually a greater power of 

discriminating odors among girls than among boys. Marro has gone further, 

and in an extended series of observations on girls before and after the 

establishment of puberty--which is of considerable interest from the point 

of view of the sexual significance of olfaction--he has shown reason to 

believe that girls acquire an increased susceptibility to odors when 

sexual life begins, although they show no such increased powers as regards 

the other senses.[52] On the whole, it would appear that, while women are 

not apt to be seriously affected, in the absence of any preliminary 

excitation, by crude body odors, they are by no means insusceptible to the 

sexual influence of olfactory impressions. It is probable, indeed, that 

they are more affected, and more frequently affected, in this way, than 

are men. 

 

Edouard de Goncourt, in his novel _Cherie_--the intimate history 

of a young girl, founded, he states, on much personal 

observation--describes (Chapter LXXXV) the delight with which 

sensuous, but chaste young girls often take in strong perfumes. 

"Perfume and love," he remarks, "impart delights which are 

closely allied." In an earlier chapter (XLIV) he writes of his 

heroine at the age of 15: "The intimately happy emotion which the 

young girl experienced in reading _Paul et Virginie_ and other 

honestly amorous books she sought to make more complete and 

intense and penetrating by soaking the book with scent, and the 

love-story reached her senses and imagination through pages moist 

with liquid perfume." 

 

Carbini (_Archivio per l'Antropologia_, 1896, fasc. 3) in a very 

thorough investigation of a large number of children, found that 

the earliest osmo-gustative sensations occurred in the fourth 

week in girls, the fifth week in boys; the first real and 

definite olfactory sensations appeared in the fifteenth month in 

girls, in the sixteenth in boys; while experiments on several 


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