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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

hundred children between the ages of 3 and 6 years showed the 

girls slightly, but distinctly, superior to the boys. It may, of 

course, be argued that these results merely show a somewhat 

greater precocity of girls. I have summarized the main 

investigations into this question in _Man and Woman_, revised and 

enlarged edition, 1904, pp. 134-138. On the whole, they seem to 

indicate greater olfactory acuteness on the part of women, but 

the evidence is by no means altogether concordant in this sense. 

Popular and general scientific opinion is also by no means always 

in harmony. Thus, Tardif, in his book on odors in relation to the 

sexual instinct, throughout assumes, as a matter of course, that 

the sense of smell is most keen in men; while, on the other hand, 

I note that in a pamphlet by Mr. Martin Perls, a manufacturing 

perfumer, it is stated with equal confidence that "it is a 

well-known fact that ladies have, even without a practice of long 

standing, a keener sense of smell than men," and on this account 

he employs a staff of young ladies for testing perfumes by smell 

in the laboratory by the glazed paper test. 

 

It is sometimes said that the use of strong perfumes by women 

indicates a dulled olfactory organ. On the other hand, it is said 

that the use of tobacco deadens the sensitiveness of the 

masculine nose. Both these statements seem to be without 

foundation. The use of a large amount of perfume is rather a 

question of taste than a question of sensory acuteness (not to 

mention that those who live in an atmosphere of perfume are, of 

course, only faintly conscious of it), and the chemist perfumer 

in his laboratory surrounded by strong odors can distinguish them 

all with great delicacy. As regards tobacco, in Spain the 

_cigarreras_ are women and girls who live perpetually in an 

atmosphere of tobacco, and Senora Pardo Bazan, who knows them 

well, remarks in her novel, _La Tribuna_, which deals with life 

in a tobacco factory, that "the acuity of the sense of smell of 

the _cigarreras_ is notable, and it would seem that instead of 

blunting the nasal membrane the tobacco makes the olfactory 

nerves keener." 

 

"It was the same as if I was in a sweet apple garden, from the 

sweetness that came to me when the light wind passed over them 

and stirred their clothes," a woman is represented as saying 

concerning a troop of handsome men in the Irish sagas (_Cuchulain 

of Muirthemne_, p. 161). The pleasure and excitement experienced 

by a woman in the odor of her lover is usually felt concerning a 

vague and mixed odor which may be characteristic, but is not 

definitely traceable to any specific bodily sexual odor. The 

general odor of the man she loves, one woman states, is highly, 

sometimes even overwhelmingly, attractive to her; but the 


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