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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

(_Archivio di Psicopatie Sessuali_, vol. i, fasc. 3, p. 36). 

Again, a young girl with some homosexual tendencies, was apt to 

experience sexual emotions when in ordinary contact with 

schoolfellows whose body odor was marked (Fere, _L'Instinct 

Sexuel_, p. 260). Such examples are fairly typical. 

 

That the body odor of men may in a large number of cases be 

highly agreeable and sexually attractive is shown by the 

testimony of male sexual inverts. There is abundant evidence to 

this effect. Raffalovich (_L'Uranisme et l'Unisexualite_, p. 126) 

insists on the importance of body odors as a sexual attraction to 

the male invert, and is inclined to think that the increased odor 

of the man's own body during sexual excitement may have an 

auto-aphrodisiacal effect which is reflected on the body of the 

loved person. The odor of peasants, of men who work in the open 

air, is specially apt to be found attractive. Moll mentions the 

case of an inverted man who found the "forest, mosslike odor" of 

a schoolfellow irresistibly attractive. 

 

The following passage from a letter written by an Italian marquis 

has been sent to me: "Bonifazio stripped one evening, to give me 

pleasure. He has the full, rounded flesh and amber coloring which 

painters of the Giorgione school gave to their S. Sebastians. 

When he began to dress, I took up an old _fascia_, or girdle of 

netted silk, which was lying under his breeches, and which still 

preserved the warmth of his body. I buried my face in it, and was 

half inebriated by its exquisite aroma of young manhood and fresh 

hay. He told me he had worn it for two years. No wonder it was 

redolent of him. I asked him to let me keep it as a souvenir. He 

smiled and said: 'You like it because it has lain so long upon my 

_panoia_.' 'Yes, just so,' I replied; 'whenever I kiss it, thus 

and thus, it will bring you back to me.' Sometimes I tie it round 

my naked waist before I go to bed. The smell of it is enough to 

cause a powerful erection, and the contact of its fringes with my 

testicles and phallus has once or twice produced an involuntary 

emission." 

 

I may here reproduce a communication which has reached me 

concerning the attractiveness of the odor of peasants: "One 

predominant attraction of these men is that they are pure and 

clean; their bodies in a state of healthy normal function. Then 

they possess, if they are temperate, what the Greek poet Straton 

called the phydike chrotos (a quality which, according to this 

authority, is never found in women). This 'natural fair perfume 

of the flesh' is a peculiar attribute of young men who live in 

the open air and deal with natural objects. Even their 

perspiration has an odor very different from that of girls in 

ball-rooms: more refined, ethereal, pervasive, delicate, and 


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