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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

difficult to seize. When they have handled hay--in the time of 

hay-harvest, or in winter, when they bring hay down from mountain 

huts--the youthful peasants carry about with them the smell of 'a 

field the Lord hath blessed.' Their bodies and their clothes 

exhale an indefinable fragrance of purity and sex combined. Every 

gland of the robust frame seems to have accumulated scent from 

herbs and grasses, which slowly exudes from the cool, fresh skin 

of the lad. You do not perceive it in a room. You must take the 

young man's hands and bury your face in them, or be covered with 

him under the same blanket in one bed, to feel this aroma. No 

sensual impression on the nerves of smell is more poignantly 

impregnated with spiritual poetry--the poetry of adolescence, and 

early hours upon the hills, and labor cheerfully accomplished, 

and the harvest of God's gifts to man brought home by human 

industry. It is worth mentioning that Aristophanes, in his 

description of the perfect Athenian Ephebus, dwells upon his 

being redolent of natural perfumes." 

 

In a passage in the second part of _Faust_ Goethe (who appears to 

have felt considerable interest in the psychology of smell) makes 

three women speak concerning the ambrosiacal odor of young men. 

 

In this connection, also, I note a passage in a poem ("Appleton 

House") by our own English poet Marvell, which it is of interest 

to quote:-- 

 

"And now the careless victors play, 

Dancing the triumphs of the hay, 

When every mower's wholesome heat 

Smells like an Alexander's sweat. 

Their females fragrant as the mead 

Which they in fairy circles tread, 

When at their dance's end they kiss, 

Their new-mown hay not sweeter is." 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[30] R. Andree, "Voelkergeruch," in _Ethnographische Parallelen_, Neue 

Folge, 1889, pp. 213-222, brings together many passages describing the 

odors of various peoples. Hagen, _Sexuelle Osphresiologie_, pp. 166 et 

seq., has a chapter on the subject; Joest, supplement to _International 

Archiv fuer Ethnographie_, 1893, p. 53, has an interesting passage on the 

smells of various races, as also Waitz, _Introduction to Anthropology_, p. 

103. Cf. Sir H.H. Johnston, _British Central Africa_, p. 395; T.H. Parke, 

_Experiences in Equatorial Africa_, p. 409; E.H. Man, _Journal of the 

Anthropological Institute_, 1889, p. 391; Brough Smyth, _Aborigines of 

Victoria_, vol. i, p. 7; d'Orbigny, _L'Homme Americain_, vol. i, p. 87, 

etc. 

 

[31] B. Adachi "Geruch der Europaer," _Globus_, 1903, No. 1. 

 

[32] Hagen quotes testimonies on this point, _Sexuelle Osphresiologie_, p. 

173. The negro, Castellani states, considers that Europeans have a smell 

of death. 

 

[33] _Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition_, vol. ii, p. 

181. 

 

[34] Waitz, _Introduction to Anthropology_, p. 103. 

 

[35] Monin, _Les Odeurs du Corps Humain_, second edition, Paris, 1886, 


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