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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

IV. 

 

The Influence of Perfumes--Their Aboriginal Relationship to Sexual Body 

Odors--This True even of the Fragrance of Flowers--The Synthetic 

Manufacture of Perfumes--The Sexual Effects of Perfumes--Perfumes perhaps 

Originally Used to Heighten the Body Odors--The Special Significance of 

the Musk Odor--Its Wide Natural Diffusion in Plants and Animals and 

Man--Musk a Powerful Stimulant--Its Widespread Use as a Perfume--Peau 

d'Espagne--The Smell of Leather and its Occasional Sexual Effects--The 

Sexual Influence of the Odors of Flowers--The Identity of many Plant Odors 

with Certain Normal and Abnormal Body Odors--The Smell of Semen in this 

Connection. 

 

 

So far we have been mainly concerned with purely personal odors. It is, 

however, no longer possible to confine the discussion of the sexual 

significance of odor within the purely animal limit. The various 

characteristics of personal odor which have been noted--alike those which 

tend to make it repulsive and those which tend to make it attractive--have 

led to the use of artificial perfumes, to heighten the natural odor when 

it is regarded as attractive, to disguise it when it is regarded as 

repellent; while at the same time, happily covering both of these 

impulses, has developed the pure delight in perfume for its own 

agreeableness, the aesthetic side of olfaction. In this way--although in a 

much less constant and less elaborate manner--the body became adorned to 

the sense of smell just as by clothing and ornament it is adorned to the 

sense of sight. 

 

But--and this is a point of great significance from our present 

standpoint--we do not really leave the sexual sphere by introducing 

artificial perfumes. The perfumes which we extract from natural products, 

or, as is now frequently the case, produce by chemical synthesis, are 

themselves either actually animal sexual odors or allied in character or 

composition, to the personal odors they are used to heighten or disguise. 

Musk is the product of glands of the male _Moschus moschiferus_ which 

correspond to preputial sebaceous glands; castoreum is the product of 

similar sexual glands in the beaver, and civet likewise from the civet; 

ambergris is an intestinal calculus found in the rectum of the 

cachelot.[53] Not only, however, are nearly all the perfumes of animal 

origin, in use by civilized man, odors which have a specially sexual 

object among the animals from which they are derived, but even the 

perfumes of flowers may be said to be of sexual character. They are given 

out at the reproductive period in the lives of plants, and they clearly 

have very largely as their object an appeal to the insects who secure 

plant fertilization, such appeal having as its basis the fact that among 

insects themselves olfactory sensibility has in many cases been developed 

in their own mating.[54] There is, for example, a moth in which both sexes 

are similarly and inconspicuously marked, but the males diffuse an 

agreeable odor, said to be like pineapple, which attracts the females.[55] 


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