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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

as well as by men, excites to the generative act. It is largely in 

reliance on this fact that in many parts of the world, especially among 

Eastern peoples and occasionally among ourselves in Europe, women have 

been accustomed to perfume the body and especially the vulva.[57] 

 

It seems highly probable that, as has been especially emphasized by Hagen, 

perfumes were primitively used by women, not as is sometimes the case in 

civilization, with the idea of disguising any possible natural odor, but 

with the object of heightening and fortifying the natural odor.[58] If the 

primitive man was inclined to disparage a woman whose odor was slight or 

imperceptible,--turning away from her with contempt, as the Polynesian 

turned away from the ladies of Sydney: "They have no smell!"--women would 

inevitably seek to supplement any natural defects in this respect, and to 

accentuate their odorous qualities, in the same way as by corsets and 

bustles, even in civilization, they have sought to accentuate the sexual 

saliencies of their bodies. In this way we may, as Hagen suggests, explain 

the fact that until recent times the odors preferred by women have not 

been the most delicate or exquisite, but the strongest, the most animal, 

the most sexual: musk, castoreum, civet, and ambergris. 

 

In that interesting novel--dealing with the adventures of a 

Jewish maiden at the Persian court of Xerxes--which under the 

title of _Esther_ has found its way into the Old Testament we are 

told that it was customary in the royal harem at Shushan to 

submit the women to a very prolonged course of perfuming before 

they were admitted to the king: "six months with oil of myrrh and 

six months with sweet odors." (_Esther_, Chapter II, v. 12.) 

 

In the _Arabian Nights_ there are many allusions to the use of 

perfumes by women with a more or less definitely stated 

aphrodisiacal intent. Thus we read in the story of Kamaralzaman: 

"With fine incense I will perfume my breasts, my belly, my whole 

body, so that my skin may melt more sweetly in thy mouth, O apple 

of my eye!" 

 

Even among savages the perfuming of the body is sometimes 

practiced with the object of inducing love in the partner. 

Schellong states that the Papuans of Kaiser Wilhelm's Land rub 

various fragrant plants into their bodies for this purpose. 

(_Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1899, ht. i, p. 19.) The 

significance of this practice is more fully revealed by Haddon 

when studying the Papuans of Torres Straits among whom the 

initiative in courtship is taken by the women. It was by scenting 

himself with a pungent odorous substance that a young man 

indicated that he was ready to be sued by the girls. A man would 

wear this scent at the back of his neck during a dance in order 

to attract the attention of a particular girl; it was believed to 

act with magical certainty, after the manner of a charm (_Reports 


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