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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to Torres Straits_, 

vol. v, pp. 211, 222, and 328). 

 

The perfume which is of all perfumes the most interesting from the present 

point of view is certainly musk. With ambergris, musk is the chief member 

of Linnaeus's group of _Odores ambrosiacae_, a group which in sexual 

significances, as Zwaardemaker remarks, ranks besides the capryl group of 

odors. It is a perfume of ancient origin; its name is Persian[59] 

(indicating doubtless the channel whence it reached Europe) and ultimately 

derived from the Sanskrit word for testicle in allusion to the fact that 

it was contained in a pouch removed from the sexual parts of the male 

musk-deer. Musk odors, however, often of considerable strength, are very 

widely distributed in Nature, alike among animals and plants. This is 

indicated by the frequency with which the word "musk" forms part of the 

names of animals and plants which are by no means always nearly related. 

We have the musk-ox, the musky mole, several species called musk-rat, the 

musk-duct, the musk-beetle; while among plants which have received their 

names from a real or supposed musky odor are, besides several that are 

called musk-plant, the musk-rose, the musk-hyacinth, the musk-mallow, the 

musk-orchid, the musk-melon, the musk-cherry, the musk-pear, the 

musk-plum, muskat and muscatels, musk-seed, musk-tree, musk-wood, etc.[60] 

But a musky odor is not merely widespread in Nature among plants and the 

lower animals, it is peculiarly associated with man. Incidentally we have 

already seen how it is regarded as characteristic of some races of man, 

especially the Chinese. Moreover, the smell of the negress is said to be 

musky in character, and among Europeans a musky odor is said to be 

characteristic of blondes. Laycock, in his _Nervous Diseases of Women_, 

stated his opinion that "the musk odor is certainly the sexual odor of 

man"; and Fere states that the musk odor is that among natural perfumes 

most nearly approaching the odor of the sexual secretions. We have seen 

that the Chinese poet vaunts the musky odor of his mistress's armpits, 

while another Oriental saying concerning the attractive woman is that "her 

navel is filled with musk." Persian literature contains many references to 

musk as an attractive body odor, and Firdusi speaks of a woman's hair as 

"a crown of musk," while the Arabian poet Motannabi says of his mistress 

that "her hyacinthine hair smells sweeter than Scythian musk." Galopin 

stated that he knew women whose natural odor of musk (and less frequently 

of ambergris) was sufficiently strong to impart to a bath in less than an 

hour a perfume due entirely to the exhalations of the musky body; it must 

be added that Galopin was an enthusiast in this matter. 

 

The special significance of musk from our present point of view lies not 

only in the fact that we here have a perfume, widely scattered throughout 

nature and often in an agreeable form, which is at the same time a very 


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