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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

flowers have an almost intoxicating effect on me. Violets, roses, 

mignonette, and many others, though very delicious, give me no sexual 

feeling at all. For this reason the line, 'The lilies and languors of 

virtue for the roses and raptures of vice' seems all wrong to me. The lily 

seems to me a very sensual flower, while the rose and its scent seem very 

good and countrified and virtuous. Shelley's description of the lily of 

the valley, 'whom youth makes so fair and _passion_ so pale,' falls in 

much more with my ideas. "I can quite understand," she adds, "that 

leather, especially of books, might have an exciting effect, as the smell 

has this _penetrating_ quality, but I do not think it produces any special 

feeling in me." This more sensuous character of white flowers is fairly 

obvious to many persons who do not experience from them any specifically 

sexual effects. To some people lilies have an odor which they describe as 

sexual, although these persons may be quite unaware that Hindu authors 

long since described the vulvar secretion of the _Padmini_, or perfect 

woman, during coitus, as "perfumed like the lily that has newly 

burst."[75] It is noteworthy that it was more especially the white 

flowers--lily, tuberose, etc.--which were long ago noted by Cloquet as 

liable to cause various unpleasant nervous effects, cardiac oppression and 

syncope.[76] 

 

When we are concerned with the fragrances of flowers it would seem that we 

are far removed from the human sexual field, and that their sexual effects 

are inexplicable. It is not so. The animal and vegetable odors, as, 

indeed, we have already seen, are very closely connected. The recorded 

cases are very numerous in which human persons have exhaled from their 

skins--sometimes in a very pronounced degree--the odors of plants and 

flowers, of violets, of roses, of pineapple, of vanilla. On the other 

hand, there are various plant odors which distinctly recall, not merely 

the general odor of the human body, but even the specifically sexual 

odors. A rare garden weed, the stinking goosefoot, _Chenopodium vulvaria_, 

it is well known, possesses a herring brine or putrid fish odor--due, it 

appears, to propylamin, which is also found in the flowers of the common 

white thorn or mayflower (_Crataegus oxyacantha_) and many others of the 

_Rosaceae_--which recalls the odor of the animal and human sexual 

regions.[77] The reason is that both plant and animal odors belong 

chemically to the same group of capryl odors (Linnaeus's _Odores hircini_), 

so called from the goat, the most important group of odors from the sexual 

point of view. Caproic and capryl acid are contained not only in the odor 

of the goat and in human sweat, and in animal products as many cheeses, 

but also in various plants, such as Herb Robert (_Geranium robertianum_), 

and the Stinking St. John's worts (_Hypericum hircinum_), as well as the 

_Chenopodium_. Zwaardemaker considers it probable that the odor of the 


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