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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

vagina belongs to the same group, as well as the odor of semen (which 

Haller called _odor aphrodisiacus_), which last odor is also found, as 

Cloquet pointed out, in the flowers of the common berberry (_Berberis 

vulgaris_) and in the chestnut. A very remarkable and significant example 

of the same odor seems to occur in the case of the flowers of the henna 

plant, the white-flowered Lawsonia (_Lawsonia inermis_), so widely used in 

some Mohammedan lands for dyeing the nails and other parts of the body. 

"These flowers diffuse the sweetest odor," wrote Sonnini in Egypt a 

century ago; "the women delight to wear them, to adorn their houses with 

them, to carry them to the baths, to hold them in their hands, and to 

perfume their bosoms with them. They cannot patiently endure that 

Christian and Jewish women shall share the privilege with them. It is very 

remarkable that the perfume of the henna flowers, when closely inhaled, is 

almost entirely lost in a very decided spermatic odor. If the flowers are 

crushed between the fingers this odor prevails, and is, indeed, the only 

one perceptible. It is not surprising that so delicious a flower has 

furnished Oriental poetry with many charming traits and amorous similes." 

Such a simile Sonnini finds in the _Song of Songs_, i. 13-14.[78] 

 

The odor of semen has not been investigated, but, according to 

Zwaardemaker, artificially produced odors (like cadaverin) resemble it. 

The odor of the leguminous fenugreek, a botanical friend considers, 

closely approaches the odor given off in some cases by the armpit in 

women. It is noteworthy that fenugreek contains cumarine, which imparts 

its fragrance to new-mown hay and to various flowers of somewhat similar 

odor. On some persons these have a sexually exciting effect, and it is of 

considerable interest to observe that they recall to many the odor of 

semen. "It seems very natural," a lady writes, "that flowers, etc., should 

have an exciting effect, as the original and by far the pleasantest way of 

love-making was in the open among flowers and fields; but a more purely 

physical reason may, I think, be found in the exact resemblance between 

the scent of semen and that of the pollen of flowering grasses. The first 

time I became aware of this resemblance it came on me with a rush that 

here was the explanation of the very exciting effect of a field of 

flowering grasses and, perhaps through them, of the scents of other 

flowers. If I am right, I suppose flower scents should affect women more 

powerfully than men in a sexual way. I do not think anyone would be likely 

to notice the odor of semen in this connection unless they had been 

greatly struck by the exciting effects of the pollen of grasses. I had 

often noticed it and puzzled over it." As pollen is the male sexual 

element of flowers, its occasionally stimulating effect in this direction 

is perhaps but an accidental result of a unity running through the organic 

world, though it may be perhaps more simply explained as a special form of 


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