Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

that nasal irritation which is felt by so many persons in a hay-field. 

Another correspondent, this time a man, tells me that he has noted the 

resemblance of the odor of semen to that of crushed grasses. A scientific 

friend who has done much work in the field of organic chemistry tells me 

he associates the odor of semen with that produced by diastasic action on 

mixing flour and water, which he regards as sexual in character. This 

again brings us to the starchy products of the leguminous plants. It is 

evident that, subtle and obscure as many questions in the physiology and 

psychology of olfaction still remain, we cannot easily escape from their 

sexual associations. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[53] H. Beauregard, _Matiere Medicale Zooelogique: Histoire des Drogues 

d'origine Animate_, 1901. 

 

[54] Professor Plateau, of Ghent, has for many years carried on a series 

of experiments which would even tend to show that insects are scarcely 

attracted by the colors of flowers at all, but mainly influenced by a 

sense which would appear to be smell. His experiments have been recorded 

during recent years (from 1887) in the _Bulletins de l'Academie Royale de 

Belgique_, and have from time to time been summarized in _Nature_, e.g., 

February 5, 1903. 

 

[55] David Sharp, _Cambridge Natural History: Insects_, Part II, p. 398. 

 

[56] Mantegazza, _Fisiologia dell' Amore_, 1873, p. 176. 

 

[57] Mantegazza (_L'Amour dans l'Humanite_, p. 94) refers to various 

peoples who practice this last custom. Egypt was a great centre of the 

practice more than 3000 years ago. 

 

[58] Hagen, _Sexuelle Osphresiologie_, 1901, p. 226. It has been suggested 

to me by a medical correspondent that one of the primitive objects of the 

hair, alike on head, mons veneris, and axilla, was to collect sweat and 

heighten its odor to sexual ends. 

 

[59] The names of all our chief perfumes are Arabic or Persian: civet, 

musk, ambergris, attar, camphor, etc. 

 

[60] Cloquet (_Osphresiologie_, pp. 73-76) has an interesting passage on 

the prevalence of the musk odor in animals, plants, and even mineral 

substances. 

 

[61] Laycock brings together various instances of the sexual odors of 

animals, insisting on their musky character (_Nervous Diseases of Women_; 

section, "Odors"). See also a section in the _Descent of Man_ (Part II, 

Chapter XVIII), in which Darwin argues that "the most odoriferous males 

are the most successful in winning the females." Distant also has an 

interesting paper on this subject, "Biological Suggestions," _Zooelogist_, 

May, 1902; he points out the significant fact that musky odors are usually 

confined to the male, and argues that animal odors generally are more 

often attractive than protective. 

 

[62] R. Whytt, _Works_, 1768, p. 543. 

 

[63] Lucretius, VI, 790-5. 

 

[64] Mohammed, said Ayesha, was very fond of perfumes, especially "men's 

scents," musk and ambergris. He used also to burn camphor on odoriferous 


Page 5 from 6:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   Forward