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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

wood and enjoy the fragrant smell, while he never refused perfumes when 

offered them as a present. The things he cared for most, said Ayesha, were 

women, scents, and foods. Muir, _Life of Mahomet_, vol. iii, p. 297. 

 

[65] H. ten Kate, _International Centralblatt fuer Anthropologie_, Ht. 6, 

1902. This author, who made observations on Japanese with Zwaardemaker's 

olfactometer, found that, contrary to an opinion sometimes stated, they 

have a somewhat defective sense of smell. He remarks that there are no 

really native Japanese perfumes. 

 

[66] Moll: _Die Kontraere Sexualempfindung_, third edition, 1890, p. 306. 

 

[67] Moll: _Libido Sexualis_, bd. 1, p. 284. 

 

[68] P. Naecke, "Un Cas de Fetichisme de Souliers," _Bulletin de la Societe 

de Medecine Mentale de Belgique_, 1894. 

 

[69] _Psychopathia Sexualis_, English edition, p. 167. 

 

[70] Philip Salmuth (_Observationes Medicae_, Centuria II, no. 63) in the 

seventeenth century recorded a case in which a young girl of noble birth 

(whose sister was fond of eating chalk, cinnamon, and cloves) experienced 

extreme pleasure in smelling old books. It would appear, however, that in 

this case the fascination lay not so much in the odor of the leather as in 

the mouldy odor of worm-eaten books; "_faetore veterum liborum, a blattis 

et tineis exesorum, situque prorsus corruptorum_" are Salmuth's words. 

 

[71] _Studies in the Psychology of Sex_, vol. iii, "Appendix B, History 

VIII." 

 

[72] _Sexuelle Osphresiologie_, p. 106. 

 

[73] Mantegazza, _Fisiologia dell' Amore_, p. 176. 

 

[74] In this connection I may quote the remark of the writer of a 

thoughtful article in the _Journal of Psychological Medicine_, 1851: "The 

use of scents, especially those allied to the musky, is one of the 

luxuries of women, and in some constitutions cannot be indulged without 

some danger to the morals, by the excitement to the ovaria which results. 

And although less potent as aphrodisiacs in their action on the sexual 

system of women than of men, we have reason to think that they cannot be 

used to excess with impunity by most." 

 

[75] _Kama Sutra_ of Vatsyayana, 1883, p. 5. 

 

[76] Cloquet, _Osphresiologie_, p. 95. 

 

[77] In Normandy the _Chenopodium_, it is said, is called "conio," and in 

Italy erba connina (con, cunnus), on account of its vulvar odor. The 

attraction of dogs to this plant has been noted. In the same way cats are 

irresistibly attracted to preparations of valerian because their own urine 

contains valerianic acid. 

 

[78] Sonnini, _Voyage dans la Haute et Basse Egypte_, 1799, vol. i. p. 

298. 

 


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