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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

heightened susceptibility to the sexual and other attractions of smell 

even among normal persons; thus we find a general tendency to delight in 

odors throughout the East, notably in India, among the ancient Hebrews, 

and in Mohammedan lands. 

 

Among the ordinary civilized population in Europe the sexual influences of 

smell play a smaller and yet not altogether negligible part. The 

diminished prominence of odors only enables them to come into action, as 

sexual influences, on close contact, when, in some persons at all events, 

personal odors may have a distinct influence in heightening sympathy or 

arousing antipathy. The range of variation among individuals is in this 

matter considerable. In a few persons olfactory sympathy or antipathy is 

so pronounced that it exerts a decisive influence in their sexual 

relationships; such persons are of olfactory type. In other persons smell 

has no part in constituting sexual relationships, but it comes into play 

in the intimate association of love, and acts as an additional excitant; 

when reinforced by association such olfactory impressions may at times 

prove irresistible. Other persons, again, are neutral in this respect, and 

remain indifferent either to the sympathetic or antipathetic working of 

personal odors, unless they happen to be extremely marked. It is probable 

that the majority of refined and educated people belong to the middle 

group of those persons who are not of predominantly olfactory type, but 

are liable from time to time to be influenced in this manner. Women are 

probably at least as often affected in this manner as men, probably more 

often. 

 

On the whole, it may be said that in the usual life of man odors play a 

not inconsiderable part and raise problems which are not without interest, 

but that their demonstrable part in actual sexual selection--whether in 

preferential mating or in assortative mating--is comparatively small. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[85] Moll has a passage on this subject, _Untersuchungen ueber die Libido 

Sexualis_. Bd. I, pp. 376-381. 

 

 

 


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