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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

HEARING. 

 

I. 

 

The Physiological Basis of Rhythm--Rhythm as a Physiological Stimulus--The 

Intimate Relation of Rhythm to Movement--The Physiological Influence of 

Music on Muscular Action, Circulation, Respiration, etc.--The Place of 

Music in Sexual Selection among the Lower Animals--Its Comparatively Small 

Place in Courtship among Mammals--The Larynx and Voice in Man--The 

Significance of the Pubertal Changes--Ancient Beliefs Concerning the 

Influence of Music in Morals, Education, and Medicine--Its Therapeutic 

Uses--Significance of the Romantic Interest in Music at Puberty--Men 

Comparatively Insusceptible to the Specifically Sexual Influence of 

Music--Rarity of Sexual Perversions on the Basis of the Sense of 

Hearing--The Part of Music in Primitive Human Courtship--Women Notably 

Susceptible to the Specifically Sexual Influence of Music and the Voice. 

 

 

The sense of rhythm--on which it may be said that the sensory exciting 

effects of hearing, including music, finally rest--may probably be 

regarded as a fundamental quality of neuro-muscular tissue. Not only are 

the chief physiological functions of the body, like the circulation and 

the respiration, definitely rhythmical, but our senses insist on imparting 

a rhythmic grouping even to an absolutely uniform succession of 

sensations. It seems probable, although this view is still liable to be 

disputed, that this rhythm is the result of kinaesthetic 

sensations,--sensations arising from movement or tension started reflexly 

in the muscles by the external stimuli,--impressing themselves on the 

sensations that are thus grouped.[86] We may thus say, with Wilks, that 

music appears to have had its origin in muscular action.[87] 

 

Whatever its exact origin may be, rhythm is certainly very deeply 

impressed on our organisms. The result is that, whatever lends itself to 

the neuro-muscular rhythmical tendency of our organisms, whatever tends 

still further to heighten and develop that rhythmical tendency, exerts 

upon us a very decidedly stimulating and exciting influence. 

 

All muscular action being stimulated by rhythm, in its simple form or in 

its more developed form as music, rhythm is a stimulant to work. It has 

even been argued by Buecher and by Wundt[88] that human song had its chief 

or exclusive origin in rhythmical vocal accompaniments to systematized 

work. This view cannot, however, be maintained; systematized work can 

scarcely be said to exist, even to-day, among most very primitive races; 

it is much more probable that rhythmical song arose at a period antecedent 

to the origin of systematized work, in the primitive military, religious, 

and erotic dances, such as exist in a highly developed degree among the 

Australians and other savage races who have not evolved co-ordinated 

systematic labor. There can, however, be no doubt that as soon as 

systematic work appears the importance of vocal rhythm in stimulating its 

energy is at once everywhere recognized. Buecher has brought together 


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