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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

(Helmholtz, _On the Sensations of Tone_, translated by A. J. 

Ellis, 1885, p. 250.) 

 

From another point of view the motor stimulus of music has been 

emphasized by Cyples: "Music connects with the only sense that 

can be perfectly manipulated. Its emotional charm has struck men 

as a great mystery. There appears to be no doubt whatever that it 

gets all the marvelous effects it has beyond the mere pleasing of 

the ear, from its random, but multitudinous summonses of the 

efferent activity, which at its vague challenges stirs 

unceasingly in faintly tumultuous irrelevancy. In this way, music 

arouses aimlessly, but splendidly, the sheer, as yet unfulfilled, 

potentiality within us." (W. Copies, _The Process of Human 

Experience_, p. 743.) 

 

The fundamental element of transformed motion in music has been 

well brought out in a suggestive essay by Goblot ("La Musique 

Descriptive," _Revue Philosophique_, July, 1901): "Sung or 

played, melody figures to the ear a successive design, a moving 

arabesque. We talk of _ascending_ and _descending_ the gamut, of 

_high_ notes or _low_ notes; the; higher voice of woman is called 

_soprano_, or _above_, the deeper voice of man is called _bass_. 

_Grave_ tones were so called by the Greeks because they seemed 

heavy and to incline downward. Sounds seem to be subject to the 

action of gravity; so that some rise and others fall. Baudelaire, 

speaking of the prelude to _Lohengrin_, remarks: 'I felt myself 

_delivered from the bonds of weight_.' And when Wagner sought to 

represent, in the highest regions of celestial space, the 

apparition of the angels bearing the Holy Grail to earth, he uses 

very high notes, and a kind of chorus played exclusively by the 

violins, divided into eight parts, in the highest notes of their 

register. The descent to earth of the celestial choir is rendered 

by lower and lower notes, the progressive disappearance of which 

represents the reascension to the ethereal regions. 

 

"Sounds seem to rise and fall; that is a fact. It is difficult to 

explain it. Some have seen in it a habit derived from the usual 

notation by which the height of the note corresponds to its 

height in the score. But the impression is too deep and general 

to be explained by so superficial and recent a cause. It has been 

suggested also that high notes are generally produced by small 

and light bodies, low notes by heavy bodies. But that is not 

always true. It has been said, again, that high notes in nature 

are usually produced by highly placed objects, while low notes 

arise from caves and low placed regions. But the thunder is heard 

in the sky, and the murmur of a spring or the song of a cricket 

arise from the earth. In the human voice, again, it is said, the 

low notes seem to resound in the chest, high notes in the head. 


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