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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

All this is unsatisfactory. We cannot explain by such coarse 

analogies an impression which is very precise, and more sensible 

(this fact has its importance) for an interval of half a tone 

than for an interval of an octave. It is probable that the true 

explanation is to be found in the still little understood 

connection between the elements of our nervous apparatus. 

 

"Nearly all our emotions tend to produce movement. But education 

renders us economical of our acts. Most of these movements are 

repressed, especially in the adult and civilized man, as harmful, 

dangerous, or merely useless. Some are not completed, others are 

reduced to a faint incitation which externally is scarcely 

perceptible. Enough remain to constitute all that is expressive 

in our gestures, physiognomy, and attitudes. Melodic intervals 

possess in a high degree this property of provoking impulses of 

movement, which, even when repressed, leave behind internal 

sensations and motor images. It would be possible to study these 

facts experimentally if we had at our disposition a human being 

who, while retaining his sensations and their motor reactions, 

was by special circumstances rendered entirely spontaneous like a 

sensitive automaton, whose movements were neither intentionally 

produced nor intentionally repressed. In this way, melodic 

intervals in a hypnotized subject might be very instructive." 

 

A number of experiments of the kind desired by Goblot had already 

been made by A. de Rochas in a book, copiously illustrated by 

very numerous instantaneous photographs, entitled _Les 

Sentiments, la Musique et la Geste_, 1900. Chapter III. De Rochas 

experimented on a single subject, Lina, formerly a model, who was 

placed in a condition of slight hypnosis, when various simple 

fragments of music were performed: recitatives, popular airs, and 

more especially national dances, often from remote parts of the 

world. The subject's gestures were exceedingly marked and varied 

in accordance with the character of the music. It was found that 

she often imitated with considerable precision the actual 

gestures of dances she could never have seen. The same music 

always evoked the same gestures, as was shown by instantaneous 

photographs. This subject, stated to be a chaste and well-behaved 

girl, exhibited no indications of definite sexual emotion under 

the influence of any kind of music. Some account is given in the 

same volume of other hypnotic experiments with music which were 

also negative as regards specific sexual phenomena. 

 

It must be noted that, as a physiological stimulus, a single musical note 

is effective, even apart from rhythm, as is well shown by Fere's 

experiments with the dynamometer and the ergograph.[94] It is, however, 

the influence of music on muscular work which has been most frequently 


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