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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

An American physician (W.F. Hutchinson) has shown that anaesthesia 

may be produced with accurately made tuning forks at certain 

rates of vibration (summarized in the _British Medical Journal_, 

June 4, 1898). Ferrand in a paper read before the Paris Academy 

of Medicine in September, 1895, gives reasons for classing some 

kinds of music as powerful antispasmodics with beneficial 

therapeutic action. The case was subsequently reported of a child 

in whom night-terrors were eased by calming music in a minor key. 

The value of music in lunatic asylums is well recognized; see 

e.g., Naecke, _Revue de Psychiatrie_, October, 1897. Vaschide and 

Vurpas (_Comptes Rendus de la Societe de Biologie_, December 13, 

1902) have recorded the case of a girl of 20, suffering from 

mental confusion with excitation and central motor 

disequilibrium, whose muscular equilibrium was restored and 

movements rendered more co-ordinated and adaptive under the 

influence of music. 

 

While there has been much extravagance in the ancient doctrine 

concerning the effects of music, the real effects are still 

considerable. Not only is this demonstrated by the experiments 

already referred to (p. 118), indicating the efficacy of musical 

sounds as physiological stimulants, but also by anatomical 

considerations. The roots of the auditory nerves, McKendrick has 

pointed out, are probably more widely distributed and have more 

extensive connections than those of any other nerve. The 

intricate connections of these nerves are still only being 

unraveled. This points to an explanation of how music penetrates 

to the very roots of our being, influencing by associational 

paths reflex mechanisms both cerebral and somatic, so that there 

is scarcely a function of the body that may not be affected by 

the rhythmical pulsations, melodic progressions, and harmonic 

combinations of musical tones. (_Nature_, June 15, 1899, p. 164.) 

 

Just as we are not entitled from the ancient belief in the influence of 

music on morals or the modern beliefs in its therapeutic influence--even 

though this has sometimes gone to the length of advocating its use in 

impotence[118]--to argue that music has a marked influence in exciting the 

specifically sexual instincts, neither are we entitled to find any similar 

argument in the fact that music is frequently associated with the 

love-feelings of youth. Men are often able to associate many of their 

earliest ideas of love in boyhood with women singing or playing; but in 

these cases it will always be found that the fascination was romantic and 

sentimental, and not specifically erotic.[119] In adult life the music 

which often seems to us to be most definitely sexual in its appeal (such 

as much of Wagner's _Tristan_) really produces this effect in part from 

the association with the story, and in part from the intellectual 


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