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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

realization of the composer's effort to translate passion into aesthetic 

terms; the actual effect of the music is not sexual, and it can well be 

believed that the results of experiments as regards the sexual influence 

of the _Tristan_ music on men under the influence of hypnotism have been, 

as reported, negative. Helmholtz goes so far as to state that the 

expression of sexual longing in music is identical with that of religious 

longing. It is quite true, again, that a soft and gentle voice seems to 

every normal man as to Lear "an excellent thing in woman," and that a 

harsh or shrill voice may seem to deaden or even destroy altogether the 

attraction of a beautiful face. But the voice is not usually in itself an 

adequate or powerful method of evoking sexual emotion in a man. Even in 

its supreme vocal manifestations the sexual fascination exerted by a great 

singer, though certainly considerable, cannot be compared with that 

commonly exerted by the actress. Cases have, indeed, been 

recorded--chiefly occurring, it is probable, in men of somewhat morbid 

nervous disposition--in which sexual attraction was exerted chiefly 

through the ear, or in which there was a special sexual sensibility to 

particular inflections or accents.[120] Fere mentions the case of a young 

man in hospital with acute arthritis who complained of painful erections 

whenever he heard through the door the very agreeable voice of the young 

woman (invisible to him) who superintended the linen.[121] But these 

phenomena do not appear to be common, or, at all events, very pronounced. 

So far as my own inquiries go, only a small proportion of men would 

appear to experience definite sexual feelings on listening to music. And 

the fact that in woman the voice is so slightly differentiated from that 

of the child, as well as the very significant fact that among man's 

immediate or even remote ancestors the female's voice can seldom have 

served to attract the male, sufficiently account for the small part played 

by the voice and by music as a sexual allurement working on men.[122] 

 

It is otherwise with women. It may, indeed, be said at the outset that the 

reasons which make it antecedently improbable that men should be sexually 

attracted through hearing render it probable that women should be so 

attracted. The change in the voice at puberty makes the deeper masculine 

voice a characteristic secondary sexual attribute of man, while the fact 

that among mammals generally it is the male that is most vocal--and that 

chiefly, or even sometimes exclusively, at the rutting season--renders it 

antecedently likely that among mammals generally, including the human 

species, there is in the female an actual or latent susceptibility to the 

sexual significance of the male voice,[123] a susceptibility which, under 

the conditions of human civilization, may be transferred to music 

generally. It is noteworthy that in novels written by women there is a 

very frequent attentiveness to the qualities of the hero's voice and to 


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