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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

its emotional effects on the heroine.[124] We may also note the special 

and peculiar personal enthusiasm aroused in women by popular musicians, a 

more pronounced enthusiasm than is evoked in them by popular actors. 

 

 

As an interesting example of the importance attached by women 

novelists to the effects of the male voice I may refer to George 

Eliot's _Mill on the Floss_, probably the most intimate and 

personal of George Eliot's works. In Book VI of this novel the 

influence of Stephen Guest (a somewhat commonplace young man) 

over Maggie Tulliver is ascribed almost exclusively to the effect 

of his base voice in singing. We are definitely told of Maggie 

Tulliver's "sensibility to the supreme excitement of music." 

Thus, on one occasion, "all her intentions were lost in the vague 

state of emotion produced by the inspiring duet--emotion that 

seemed to make her at once strong and weak: strong for all 

enjoyment, weak for all resistance. Poor Maggie! She looked very 

beautiful when her soul was being played on in this way by the 

inexorable power of sound. You might have seen the slightest 

perceptible quivering through her whole frame as she leaned a 

little forward, clasping her hands as if to steady herself; while 

her eyes dilated and brightened into that wideopen, childish 

expression of wondering delight, which always came back in her 

happiest moments." George Eliot's novels contain many allusions 

to the powerful emotional effects of music. 

 

It is unnecessary to refer to Tolstoy's _Kreutzer Sonata_, in 

which music is regarded as the Galeotto to bring lovers 

together--"the connecting bond of music, the most refined lust of 

the senses." 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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