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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

activity. It is furthermore a kind of "skin-heart," promoting the 

circulation by its own energy; it is the great heat-regulating 

organ of the body; it is an excretory organ only second to the 

kidneys, which descend from it, and finally it still remains the 

seat of touch. 

 

It may be added that the extreme beauty of the skin as a surface 

is very clearly brought out by the inadequacy of the comparisons 

commonly used in order to express its beauty. Snow, marble, 

alabaster, ivory, milk, cream, silk, velvet, and all the other 

conventional similes furnish surfaces which from any point of 

view are incomparably inferior to the skin itself. (Cf. Stratz, 

_Die Schoenheit des Weiblichen Koerpers_, Chapter XII.) 

 

With reference to the extraordinary vitality of the skin, 

emphasized by Woods Hutchinson, it may be added that, when 

experimenting on the skin with the electric current, Waller found 

that healthy skin showed signs of life ten days or more after 

excision. It has been found also that fragments of skin which 

have been preserved in sterile fluid for even as long as nine 

months may still be successfully transplanted on to the body. 

(_British Medical Journal_, July 19, 1902.) 

 

Everything indicates, remark Stanley Hall and Donaldson ("Motor 

Sensations in the Skin," _Mind_, 1885), that the skin is "not 

only the primeval and most reliable source of our knowledge of 

the external world or the archaeological field of psychology," but 

a field in which work may shed light on some of the most 

fundamental problems of psychic action. Groos (_Spiele der 

Menschen_, pp. 8-16) also deals with the primitive character of 

touch sensations. 

 

Touch sensations are without doubt the first of all the sensory 

impressions to prove pleasurable. We should, indeed, expect this 

from the fact that the skin reflexes have already appeared before 

birth, while a pleasurable sensitiveness of the lips is doubtless 

a factor in the child's response to the contact of the maternal 

nipple. Very early memories of sensory pleasure seem to be 

frequently, perhaps most frequently, tactile in character, though 

this fact is often disguised in recollection, owing to tactile 

impression being vague and diffused; there is thus in Elizabeth 

Potwin's "Study of Early Memories" (_Psychological Review_, 

November, 1901) no separate group of tactile memories, and the 

more elaborate investigation by Colegrove ("Individual Memories," 

_American Journal of Psychology_, January, 1899) yields no 

decisive results under this head. See, however, Stanley Hall's 

valuable study, "Some Aspects of the Early Sense of Self," 

_American Journal of Psychology_, April, 1898. Kuelpe has a 

discussion of the psychology of cutaneous sensations (_Outlines 

of Psychology_ [English translation], pp. 87 et seq.) 


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