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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

antiquity--still persisted to the beginning of the eighteenth century. In 

France the same custom existed in the seventeenth century, but in the 

middle of that century was beginning to be regarded as dangerous,[2] while 

at the present time the conventional kiss on the cheek is strictly 

differentiated from the kiss on the mouth, which is reserved for lovers. 

Touch contacts between person and person, other than those limited and 

defined by custom, tend to become either unpleasant--as an undesired 

intrusion into an intimate sphere--or else, when occurring between man and 

woman at some peculiar moment, they may make a powerful reverberation in 

the emotional and more specifically sexual sphere. One man falls in love 

with his future wife because he has to carry her upstairs with a sprained 

ankle. Another dates his love-story from a romp in which his cheek 

accidentally came in contact with that of his future wife. A woman will 

sometimes instinctively strive to attract the attention of the man who 

appeals to her by a peculiar and prolonged pressure of the hand--the only 

touch contact permitted to her. Dante, as Penta has remarked, refers to 

"sight or touch" as the two channels through which a woman's love is 

revived (_Purgatorio_, VIII, 76). Even the hand-shake of a sympathetic man 

is enough in some chaste and sensitive women to produce sexual excitement 

or sometimes even the orgasm. The cases in which love arises from the 

influence of stimuli coming through the sense of touch are no doubt 

frequent, and they would be still more frequent if it were not that the 

very proximity of this sense to the sexual sphere causes it to be guarded 

with a care which in the case of the other senses it is impossible to 

exercise. This intimacy of touch and the reaction against its sexual 

approximations leads to what James has called "the _antisexual instinct_, 

the instinct of personal isolation, the actual repulsiveness to us of the 

idea of intimate contact with most of the persons we meet, especially 

those of our own sex." He refers in this connection to the unpleasantness 

of the sensation felt on occupying a seat still warm from the body of 

another person.[3] The Catholic Church has always recognized the risks of 

vuluptuous emotion involved in tactile contacts, and the facility with 

which even the most innocent contacts may take on a libidinous 

character.[4] 

 

The following observations were written by a lady (aged 30) who 

has never had sexual relationships: "I am only conscious of a 

very sweet and pleasurable emotion when coming in contact with 

honorable men, and consider that a comparison can be made between 

the idealism of such emotions and those of music, of beauties of 

Nature, and of productions of art. While studying and writing 

articles upon a new subject I came in contact with a specialist, 

who rendered me considerable aid, and, one day, while jointly 

correcting a piece of work, he touched my hand. This produced a 


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