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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

In primitive human courtship music very frequently plays a considerable 

part, though not usually the sole part, being generally found as the 

accompaniment of the song and the dance at erotic festivals.[125] The 

Gilas, of New Mexico, among whom courtship consists in a prolonged 

serenade day after day with the flute, furnish a somewhat exceptional 

case. Savage women are evidently very attentive to music; Backhouse (as 

quoted, by Ling Roth[126]) mentions how a woman belonging to the very 

primitive and now extinct Tasmanian race, when shown a musical box, 

listened "with intensity; her ears moved like those of a dog or horse, to 

catch the sound." 

 

I have found little evidence to show that music, except in occasional 

cases, exerts even the slightest specifically sexual effect on men, 

whether musical or unmusical. But I have ample evidence that it very 

frequently exerts to a slight but definite extent such an influence on 

women, even when quite normal. Judging from my own inquiries it would, 

indeed, seem likely that the majority of normal educated women are liable 

to experience some degree of definite sexual excitement from music; one 

states that orchestral music generally tends to produce this effect; 

another finds it chiefly from Wagner's music; another from military music, 

etc. Others simply state--what, indeed, probably expresses the experience 

of most persons of either sex--that it heightens one's mood. One lady 

mentions that some of her friends, whose erotic feelings are aroused by 

music, are especially affected in this way by the choral singing in Roman 

Catholic churches.[127] 

 

 

In the typical cases just mentioned, all fairly normal and healthy women, 

the sexual effects of music though definite were usually quite slight. In 

neuropathic subjects they may occasionally be more pronounced. Thus, a 

medical correspondent has communicated to me the case of a married lady 

with one child, a refined, very beautiful, but highly neurotic, woman, 

married to a man with whom she has nothing in common. Her tastes lie in 

the direction of music; she is a splendid pianist, and her highly trained 

voice would have made a fortune. She confesses to strong sexual feelings 

and does not understand why intercourse never affords what she knows she 

wants. But the hearing of beautiful music, or at times the excitement of 

her own singing, will sometimes cause intense orgasm. 

 

Vaschide and Vurpas, who emphasize the sexually stimulating 

effects of music, only bring forward one case in any detail, and 

it is doubtless significant that this case is a woman. "While 

listening to a piece of music X changes expression, her eyes 

become bright, the features are accentuated, a smile begins to 

form, an expression of pleasure appears, the body becomes more 

erect, there is a general muscular hypertonicity. X tells us that 

as she listens to the music she experiences sensations very like 

those of normal intercourse. The difference chiefly concerns the 


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