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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

local genital apparatus, for there is no flow of vaginal mucus. 

On the psychic side the resemblance is marked." (Vaschide and 

Vurpas, "Du Coefficient Sexual de l'Impulsion Musicale," 

_Archives de Neurologie_, May, 1904.) 

 

It is sometimes said, or implied, that a woman (or a man) sings 

better under the influence of sexual emotion. The writer of an 

article already quoted, on "Woman in her Psychological Relations" 

(_Journal of Psychological Medicine_, 1851), mentions that "a 

young lady remarkable for her musical and poetical talents 

naively remarked to a friend who complimented her upon her 

singing: 'I never sing half so well as when I've had a 

love-fit.'" And George Eliot says. "There is no feeling, perhaps, 

except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not make a man 

sing or play the better." While, however, it may be admitted that 

some degree of general emotional exaltation may exercise a 

favorable influence on the singing voice, it is difficult to 

believe that definite physical excitement at or immediately 

before the exercise of the voice can, as a rule, have anything 

but a deleterious effect on its quality. It is recognized that 

tenors (whose voices resemble those of women more than basses, 

who are not called upon to be so careful in this respect) should 

observe rules of sexual hygiene; and menstruation frequently has 

a definite influence in impairing the voice (H. Ellis, _Man and 

Woman_, fourth edition, p. 290). As the neighborhood of 

menstruation is also the period when sexual excitement is most 

likely to be felt, we have here a further indication that sexual 

emotion is not favorable to singing. I agree with the remarks of 

a correspondent, a musical amateur, who writes: "Sexual 

excitement and good singing do not appear to be correlated. A 

woman's emotional capacity in singing or acting may be remotely 

associated with hysterical neuroses, but is better evinced for 

art purposes in the absence of disturbing sexual influences. A 

woman may, indeed, fancy herself the heroine of a wanton romance 

and 'let herself go' a little in singing with improved results. 

But a memory of sexual ardors will help no woman to make the best 

of her voice in training. Some women can only sing their best 

when they think of the other women they are outsinging. One girl 

'lets her soul go out into her voice' thinking of jamroll, 

another thinking of her lover (when she has none), and most, no 

doubt, when they think of nothing. But no woman is likely to 

'find herself' in an artistic sense because she has lost herself 

in another sense--not even if she has done so quite respectably." 

 

The reality of the association between the sexual impulse and music--and, 

indeed, art generally--is shown by the fact that the evolution of puberty 


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