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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

p. 355) quotes some remarks of Kistemaecker's concerning the sound of 

women's garments and the way in which savages and sometimes civilized 

women cultivate this rustling and clinking. Gutzkow, in his 

_Autobiography_, said that the _frou-frou_ of a woman's dress was the 

music of the spheres to him. 

 

[122] The voice is doubtless a factor of the first importance in sexual 

attraction among the blind. On this point I have no data. The 

expressiveness of the voice to the blind, and the extent to which their 

likes and dislikes are founded on vocal qualities, is well shown by an 

interesting paper written by an American physician, blind from early 

infancy, James Cocke, "The Voice as an Index to the Soul," _Arena_, 

January, 1894. 

 

[123] Long before Darwin had set forth his theory of sexual selection 

Laycock had pointed out the influence which the voice of the male, among 

man and other animals, exerts on the female (_Nervous Diseases of Women_, 

p. 74). And a few years later the writer of a suggestive article on "Woman 

in her Psychological Relations" (_Journal of Psychological Medicine_, 

1851) remarked: "The sonorous voice of the male man is exactly analogous 

in its effect on woman to the neigh and bellow of other animals. This 

voice will have its effect on an amorous or susceptible organization much 

in the same way as color and the other visual ovarian stimuli." The writer 

adds that it exercises a still more important influence when modulated to 

music: "in this respect man has something in common with insects as well 

as birds." 

 

[124] Groos refers more than once to the important part played in German 

novels written by women by what one of them terms the "bearded male 

voice." 

 

[125] Various instances are quoted in the third volume of these _Studies_ 

when discussing the general phenomena of courtship and tumescence, "An 

Analysis of the Sexual Impulse." 

 

[126] _The Tasmanians_, p. 20. 

 

[127] An early reference to the sexual influence of music on women may 

perhaps be found in a playful passage in Swift's _Martinus Scriblerus_ 

(possibly due to his medical collaborator, Arbuthnot): "Does not AElian 

tell how the Libyan mares were excited to horsing by music? (which ought 

to be a caution to modest women against frequenting operas)." _Memoirs of 

Martinus Scriblerus_, Book I, Chapter 6. (The reference is to AElian, 

_Hist. Animal_, lib. XI, cap. 18, and lib. XII, cap. 44.) 

 

[128] E. Lancaster, "Psychology of Adolescence," _Pedagogical Seminary_, 

July, 1897. 

 

II. 

 

Summary--Why the Influence of Music in Human Sexual Selection is 

Comparatively Small. 

 

 

We have seen that it is possible to set forth in a brief space the facts 

at present available concerning the influence on the pairing impulse of 

stimuli acting through the ear. They are fairly simple and uncomplicated; 

they suggest few obscure problems which call for analysis; they do not 

bring before us any remarkable perversions of feeling. 


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