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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

hear each other without speedily seeing each other, and then the chief 

focus of interest is at once transferred to the visual centre.[130] In 

human sexual selection, therefore, hearing plays a part which is nearly 

always subordinated to that of vision. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[129] Nietzsche has even suggested that among primitive men delicacy of 

hearing and the evolution of music can only have been produced under 

conditions which made it difficult for vision to come into play: "The ear, 

the organ of fear, could only have developed, as it has, in the night and 

in the twilight of dark woods and caves.... In the brightness the ear is 

less necessary. Hence the character of music as an art of night and 

twilight." (_Morgenroethe_, p. 230.) 

 

[130] At a concert most people are instinctively anxious to _see_ the 

performers, thus distracting the purely musical impression, and the 

reasonable suggestion of Goethe that the performers should be invisible is 

still seldom carried into practice. 

 

 


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