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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

birth and rearing of each generation might retain a savage 

independence. For them it would not be necessary that any vision 

should fascinate, or that any languor should soften, the prying 

cruelty of the eye. But sex endows the individual with a dumb and 

powerful instinct, which carries his body and soul continually 

toward another; makes it one of the dearest enjoyments of his 

life to select and pursue a companion, and joins to possession 

the keenest pleasure, to rivalry the fiercest rage, and to 

solitude an eternal melancholy. What more could be needed to 

suffuse the world with the deepest meaning and beauty? The 

attention is fixed upon a well-defined object, and all the 

effects it produces in the mind are easily regarded as powers or 

qualities of that object.... To a certain extent this kind of 

interest will center in the proper object of sexual passion, and 

in the special characteristics of the opposite sex[131]; and we 

find, accordingly, that woman is the most lovely object to man, 

and man, if female modesty would confess it, the most interesting 

to woman. But the effects of so fundamental and primitive a 

reaction are much more general. Sex is not the only object of 

sexual passion. When love lacks its specific object, when it does 

not yet understand itself, or has been sacrificed to some other 

interest, we see the stifled fire bursting out in various 

directions.... Passion then overflows and visibly floods those 

neighboring regions which it had always secretly watered. For the 

same nervous organization which sex involves, with its 

necessarily wide branchings and associations in the brain, must 

be partially stimulated by other objects than its specific or 

ultimate one; especially in man, who, unlike some of the lower 

animals, has not his instincts clearly distinct and intermittent, 

but always partially active, and never active in isolation. We 

may say, then, that for man all nature is a secondary object of 

sexual passion, and that to this fact the beauty of nature is 

largely due." (G. Santayana, _The Sense of Beauty_, pp. 59-62.) 

 

Not only is the general fact of sexual attraction an essential 

element of aesthetic contemplation, as Santayana remarks, but we 

have to recognize also that specific sexual emotion properly 

comes within the aesthetic field. It is quite erroneous, as Groos 

well points out, to assert that sexual emotion has no aesthetic 

value. On the contrary, it has quite as much value as the emotion 

of terror or of pity. Such emotion, must, however, be duly 

subordinated to the total aesthetic effect. (K. Groos, _Der 

AEsthetische Genuss_, p. 151.) 

 

"The idea of beauty," Remy de Gourmont says, "is not an unmixed 

idea; it is intimately united with the idea of carnal pleasure. 

Stendhal obscurely perceived this when he defined beauty as 'a 


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