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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

promise of happiness.' Beauty is a woman, and women themselves 

have carried docility to men so far as to accept this aphorism 

which they can only understand in extreme sexual perversion.... 

Beauty is so sexual that the only uncontested works of art are 

those that simply show the human body in its nudity. By its 

perseverance in remaining purely sexual Greek statuary has placed 

itself forever above all discussion. It is beautiful because it 

is a beautiful human body, such a one as every man or every woman 

would desire to unite with in the perpetuation of the race.... 

That which inclines to love seems beautiful; that which seems 

beautiful inclines to love. This intimate union of art and of 

love is, indeed, the only explanation of art. Without this 

genital echo art would never have been born and never have been 

perpetuated. There is nothing useless in these deep human depths; 

everything which has endured is necessary. Art is the accomplice 

of love. When love is taken away there is no art; when art is 

taken away love is nothing but a physiological need." (Remy de 

Gourmont, _Culture des Idees_, 1900, p. 103, and _Mercure de 

France_, August, 1901, pp. 298 et seq.) 

 

Beauty as incarnated in the feminine body has to some extent 

become the symbol of love even for women. Colin Scott finds that 

it is common among women who are not inverted for female beauty 

whether on the stage or in art to arouse sexual emotion to a 

greater extent than male beauty, and this is confirmed by some of 

the histories I have recorded in the Appendix to the third 

volume of these _Studies_. Scott considers that female beauty has 

come to be regarded as typical of ideal beauty, and thus tends to 

produce an emotional effect on both sexes alike. It is certainly 

rare to find any aesthetic admiration of men among women, except 

in the case of women who have had some training in art. In this 

matter it would seem that woman passively accepts the ideals of 

man. "Objects which excite a man's desire," Colin Scott remarks, 

"are often, if not generally, the same as those affecting woman. 

The female body has a sexually stimulating effect upon both 

sexes. Statues of female forms are more liable than those of male 

form to have a stimulating effect upon women as well as men. The 

evidence of numerous literary expressions seems to show that 

under the influence of sexual excitement a woman regards her body 

as made for man's gratification, and that it is this complex 

emotion which forms the initial stage, at least, of her own 

pleasure. Her body is the symbol for her partner, and indirectly 

for her, through his admiration of it, of their mutual joy and 

satisfaction." (Colin Scott, "Sex and Art," _American Journal of 

Psychology_, vol. vii, No. 2, p. 206; also private letter.) 


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