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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

At the same time it must be remembered that beauty and the 

conception of beauty have developed on a wider basis than that of 

the sexual impulse only, and also that our conceptions of the 

beautiful, even as concerns the human form, are to some extent 

objective, and may thus be in part reduced to law. Stratz, in his 

books on feminine beauty, and notably in _Die Schoenheit des 

Weiblichen Koerpers_, insists on the objective element in beauty. 

Papillault, again, when discussing the laws of growth and the 

beauty of the face, argues that beauty of line in the face is 

objective, and not a creation of fancy, since it is associated 

with the highest human functions, moral and social. He remarks on 

the contrast between the prehistoric man of 

Chancelade,--delicately made, with elegant face and high 

forehead,--who created the great Magdalenian civilization, and 

his seemingly much more powerful, but less beautiful, 

predecessor, the man of Spy, with enormous muscles and powerful 

jaws. (_Bulletin de la Societe d'Anthropologie_, 1899, p. 220.) 

 

The largely objective character of beauty is further indicated by 

the fact that to a considerable extent beauty is the expression 

of health. A well and harmoniously developed body, tense muscles, 

an elastic and finely toned skin, bright eyes, grace and 

animation of carriage--all these things which are essential to 

beauty are the conditions of health. It has not been demonstrated 

that there is any correlation between beauty and longevity, and 

the proof would not be easy to give, but it is quite probable 

that such a correlation may exist, and various indications point 

in this direction. One of the most delightful of Opie's pictures 

is the portrait of Pleasance Reeve (afterward Lady Smith) at the 

age of 17. This singularly beautiful and animated brunette lived 

to the age of 104. Most people are probably acquainted with 

similar, if less marked, cases of the same tendency. 

 

The extreme sexual importance of beauty, so far, at all events, as 

conscious experience is concerned is well illustrated by the fact that, 

although three other senses may and often do play a not inconsiderable 

part in the constitution of a person's sexual attractiveness,--the tactile 

element being, indeed, fundamental,--yet in nearly all the most elaborate 

descriptions of attractive individuals it is the visible elements that are 

in most cases chiefly emphasized. Whether among the lowest savages or in 

the highest civilization, the poet and story-teller who seeks to describe 

an ideally lovely and desirable woman always insists mainly, and often 

exclusively, on those characters which appeal to the eye. The richly laden 

word _beauty_ is a synthesis of complex impressions obtained through a 

single sense, and so simple, comparatively, and vague are the impressions 


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