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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

derived from the other senses that none of them can furnish us with any 

corresponding word. 

 

Before attempting to analyze the conception of beauty, regarded 

in its sexual appeal to the human mind, it may be well to bring 

together a few fairly typical descriptions of a beautiful woman 

as she appears to the men of various nations. 

 

In an Australian folklore story taken down from the lips of a 

native some sixty years ago by W. Dunlop (but evidently not in 

the native's exact words) we find this description of an 

Australian beauty: "A man took as his wife a beautiful girl who 

had long, glossy hair hanging around her face and down her 

shoulders, which were plump and round. Her face was adorned with 

red clay and her person wrapped in a fine large opossum rug 

fastened by a pin formed from the small bone of the kangaroo's 

leg, and also by a string attached to a wallet made of rushes 

neatly plaited of small strips skinned from their outside after 

they had been for some time exposed to the heat of the fire; 

which being thrown on her back, the string passing under one arm 

and across her breast, held the soft rug in a fanciful position 

of considerable elegance; and she knew well how to show to 

advantage her queenlike figure when she walked with her polished 

yam stick held in one of her small hands and her little feet 

appearing below the edge of the rug" (W. Dunlop, "Australian 

Folklore Stories," _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, 

August and November, 1898, p. 27). 

 

A Malay description of female beauty is furnished by Skeat. "The 

brow (of the Malay Helen for whose sake a thousand desperate 

battles are fought in Malay romances) is like the one-day-old 

moon; her eyebrows resemble 'pictured clouds,' and are 'arched 

like the fighting-cock's (artificial) spur'; her cheek resembles 

the 'sliced-off cheek of a mango'; her nose, 'an opening jasmine 

bud'; her hair, the 'wavy blossom shoots of the areca-palm'; 

slender is her neck, 'with a triple row of dimples'; her bosom 

ripening, her waist 'lissom as the stalk of a flower,' her head; 

'of a perfect oval' (literally, bird's-egg shaped), her fingers 

like the leafy 'spears of lemon-grass' or the 'quills of the 

porcupine,' her eyes 'like the splendor of the planet Venus,' and 

her lips 'like the fissure of a pomegranate.'" (W.W. Skeat, 

_Malay Magic_, 1900, p. 363.) 

 

In Mitford's _Tales of Old Japan_ (vol. i, p. 215) a "peerlessly 

beautiful girl of 16" is thus described: "She was neither too fat 

nor too thin, neither too tall nor too short; her face was oval, 

like a melon-seed, and her complexion fair and white;; her eyes 

were narrow and bright, her teeth small and even; her nose was 

aquiline, and her mouth delicately formed, with lovely red lips; 

her eyebrows were long and fine; she had a profusion of long 


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