Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Paris, fasc. 25, 1875.) 

 

In the story of Kamaralzaman in the _Arabian Nights_ El-Sett 

Budur is thus described: "Her hair is so brown that it is blacker 

than the separation of friends. And when it is arrayed in three 

tresses that reach to her feet I seem to see three nights at 

once. 

 

"Her face is as white as the day on which friends meet again. If 

I look on it at the time of the full moon I see two moons at 

once. 

 

"Her cheeks are formed of an anemone divided into two corollas; 

they have the purple tinge of wine, and her nose is straighter 

and more delicate than the finest sword-blade. 

 

"Her lips are colored agate and coral; her tongue secretes 

eloquence; her saliva is more desirable than the juice of 

grapes. 

 

"But her bosom, blessed be the Creator, is a living seduction. It 

bears twin breasts of the purest ivory, rounded, and that may be 

held within the five fingers of one hand. 

 

"Her belly has dimples full of shade and arranged with the 

harmony of the Arabic characters on the seal of a Coptic scribe 

in Egypt. And the belly gives origin to her finely modeled and 

elastic waist. 

 

"At the thought of her flanks I shudder, for thence depends a 

mass so weighty that it obliges its owner to sit down when she 

has risen and to rise when she lies. 

 

"Such are her flanks, and from them descend, like white marble, 

her glorious thighs, solid and straight, united above beneath 

their crown. Then come the legs and the slender feet, so small 

that I am astounded they can bear so great a weight." 

 

An Egyptian stela in the Louvre sings the praise of a beautiful 

woman, a queen who died about 700 B.C., as follows: "The beloved 

before all women, the king's daughter who is sweet in love, the 

fairest among women, a maid whose like none has seen. Blacker is 

her hair than the darkness of night, blacker than the berries of 

the blackberry bush (?). Harder are her teeth (?) than the flints 

on the sickle. A wreath of flowers is each of her breasts, close 

nestling on her arms." Wiedemann, who quotes this, adds: "During 

the whole classic period of Egyptian history with few exceptions 

(such, for example, as the reign of that great innovator, 

Amenophis IV) the ideal alike for the male and the female body 

was a slender and but slightly developed form. Under the 

Ethiopian rule and during the Ptolemaic period in Egypt itself we 

find, for the first time, that the goddesses are represented with 

plump and well-developed outlines. Examination of the mummies 

shows that the earlier ideal was based upon actual facts, and 

that in ancient Egypt slender, sinewy forms distinguished both 

men and women. Intermarriage with other races and harem life may 

have combined in later times to alter the physical type, and with 


Page 3 from 7:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   7   Forward