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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

it to change also the ideal of beauty." (A. Wiedemann, _Popular 

Literature in Ancient Egypt_, p. 7.) 

 

Commenting on Plato's ideas of beauty in the _Banquet_ 

Emeric-David gives references from Greek literature showing that 

the typical Greek beautiful woman must be tall, her body supple, 

her fingers long, her foot small and light, the eyes clear and 

moderately large, the eyebrows slightly arched and almost 

meeting, the nose straight and firm, nearly--but not 

quite--aquiline, the breath sweet as honey. (Emeric-David, 

_Recherches sur l'Art Statuaire_, new edition, 1863, p. 42.) 

 

At the end of classic antiquity, probably in the fifth century, 

Aristaenetus in his first Epistle thus described his mistress 

Lais: "Her cheeks are white, but mixed in imitation of the 

splendor of the rose; her lips are thin, by a narrow space 

separated from the cheeks, but more red; her eyebrows are black 

and divided in the middle; the nose straight and proportioned to 

the thin lips; the eyes large and bright, with very black pupils, 

surrounded by the clearest white, each color more brilliant by 

contrast. Her hair is naturally curled, and, as Homer's saying 

is, like the hyacinth. The neck is white and proportioned to the 

face, and though unadorned more conspicuous by its delicacy; but 

a necklace of gems encircles it, on which her name is written in 

jewels. She is tall and elegantly dressed in garments fitted to 

her body and limbs. When dressed her appearance is beautiful; 

when undressed she is all beauty. Her walk is composed and slow; 

she looks like a cypress or a palm stirred by the wind. I cannot 

describe how the swelling, symmetrical breasts raise the 

constraining vest, nor how delicate and supple her limbs are. And 

when she speaks, what sweetness in her discourse!" 

 

Renier has studied the feminine ideal of the Provencal poets, the 

troubadours who used the "langue d'oc." "They avoid any 

description of the feminine type. The indications refer in great 

part to the slender, erect, fresh appearance of the body, and to 

the white and rosy coloring. After the person generally, the eyes 

receive most praise; they are sweet, amorous, clear, smiling, and 

bright. The color is never mentioned. The mouth is laughing, and 

vermilion, and, smiling sweetly, it reveals the white teeth and 

calls for the delights of the kiss. The face is clear and fresh, 

the hand white and the hair constantly blonde. The troubadours 

seldom speak of the rest of the body. Peire Vidal is an 

exception, and his reference to the well-raised breasts may be 

placed beside a reference by Bertran de Born. The general 

impression conveyed by the love lyrics of the langue d'oc is one 

of great convention. There seemed to be no salvation outside 

certain phrases and epithets. The woman of Provence, sung by 


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