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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

hundreds of poets, seems to have been composed all of milk and 

roses, a blonde Nuremburg doll." (R. Renier, _Il Tipo Estetico 

della Donna nel Medioevo_, 1885, pp. 1-24.) 

 

The conventional ideal of the troubadours is, again, thus 

described: "She is a lady whose skin is white as milk, whiter 

than the driven snow, of peculiar purity in whiteness. Her 

cheeks, on which vermilion hues alone appear, are like the 

rosebud in spring, when it has not yet opened to the full. Her 

hair, which is nearly always bedecked and adorned with flowers, 

is invariably of the color of flax, as soft as silk, and 

shimmering with a sheen of the finest gold." (J.F. Rowbotham, 

_The Troubadours and Courts of Love_, p. 228.) 

 

In the most ancient Spanish romances, Renier remarks, the 

definite indications of physical beauty are slight. The hair is 

"of pure gold," or simply fair (_rudios_, which is equal to 

_blondos_, a word of later introduction), the face white and 

rosy, the hand soft, white, and fragrant; in one place we find a 

reference to the uncovered breasts, whiter than crystal. But 

usually the ancient Castilian romances do not deal with these 

details. The poet contents himself with the statement that a lady 

is the sweetest woman in the world, "_la mas linda mujer del 

mundo_." (R. Renier, _Il Tipo Estetico della Donna nel Medioevo_, 

pp. 68 et seq.) 

 

In a detailed and well-documented thesis, Alwin Schultz describes 

the characteristics of the beautiful woman as she appealed to the 

German authors of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. She must 

be of medium height and slender. Her hair must be fair, like 

gold; long, bright, and curly; a man's must only reach to his 

shoulders. Dark hair is seldom mentioned and was not admired. The 

parting of the hair must be white, but not too broad. The 

forehead must be white and bright and rounded, without wrinkles. 

The eyebrows must be darker than the hair, arched, and not too 

broad, as though drawn with a pencil, the space between them not 

too broad. The eyes must be bright, clear, and sparkling, not too 

large or too small; nothing definite was said of the color, but 

they were evidently usually blue. The nose must be of medium 

size, straight, and not curved. The cheeks must be white, tinged 

with red; if the red was absent by nature women used rouge. The 

mouth must be small; the lips full and red. The teeth must be 

small, white, and even. The chin must be white, rounded, lovable, 

dimpled; the ears small and beautiful; the neck of medium size, 

soft, white, and spotless; the arm small; the hands and fingers 

long; the joints small, the nails white and bright and well cared 

for. The bosom must be white and large; the breasts high and 

rounded, like apples or pears, small and soft. The body generally 


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