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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

"Her hair was divided into a double tress," says Alain of Lille 

in the twelfth century, "which was long enough to kiss the 

ground; the parting, white as the lily and obliquely traced, 

separated the hair, and this want of symmetry, far from hurting 

her face, was one of the elements of her beauty. A golden comb 

maintained that abundant hair whose brilliance rivaled it, so 

that the fascinated eye could scarce distinguish the gold of the 

hair from the gold of the comb. The expanded forehead had the 

whiteness of milk, and rivaled the lily; her bright eyebrows 

shone like gold, not standing up in a brush, and, without being 

too scanty, orderly arranged. The eyes, serene and brilliant in 

their friendly light, seemed twin stars, her nostrils embalsamed 

with the odor of honey, neither too depressed in shape nor too 

prominent, were of distinguished form; the nard of her mouth 

offered to the smell a treat of sweet odors, and her half-open 

lips invited a kiss. The teeth seemed cut in ivory; her cheeks, 

like the carnation of the rose, gently illuminated her face and 

were tempered by the transparent whiteness of her veil. Her chin, 

more polished than crystal, showed silver reflections, and her 

slender neck fitly separated her head from the shoulders. The 

firm rotundity of her breasts attested the full expansion of 

youth; her charming arms, advancing toward you, seemed to call 

for caresses; the regular curve of her flanks, justly 

proportioned, completed her beauty. All the visible traits of her 

face and form thus sufficiently told what those charms must be 

that the bed alone knew." (The Latin text is given by Houdoy, _La 

Beaute des Femmes du XIIe au XVIe Siecle_, p. 119. Robert de 

Flagy's portrait of Blanchefleur in _Sarin-le-Loherain_, written 

in same century, reveals very similar traits.) 

 

 

 

"The young woman appeared with twenty brightly polished daggers 

and swords," we read in the Irish _Tain Bo Cuailgne_ of the 

Badhbh or Banshee who appeared to Meidhbh, "together with seven 

braids for the dead, of bright gold, in her right hand; a 

speckled garment of green ground, fastened by a bodkin at the 

breast under her fair, ruddy countenance, enveloped her form; her 

teeth were so new and bright that they appeared like pearls 

artistically set in her gums; like the ripe berry of the mountain 

ash were her lips; sweeter was her voice than the notes of the 

gentle harp-strings when touched by the most skillful fingers, 

and emitting the most enchanting melody; whiter than the snow of 

one night was her skin, and beautiful to behold were her 

garments, which reached to her well molded, bright-nailed feet; 

copious tresses of her tendriled, glossy, golden hair hung 

before, while others dangled behind and reached the calf of her 

leg." (_Ossianio Transactions_, vol. ii, p. 107.) 


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