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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

She was seventy years of age when he wrote the elaborate account 

of her beauty. She had blue eyes and fair hair, though belonging 

to one of the darkest parts of France. 

 

Ploss and Bartels (_Das Weib_, bd. 1, sec. 3) have independently 

brought together a number of passages from the writers of many 

countries describing their ideals of beauty. On this collection I 

have not drawn. 

 

When we survey broadly the ideals of feminine beauty set down by the 

peoples of many lands, it is interesting to note that they all contain 

many features which appeal to the aesthetic taste of the modern European, 

and many of them, indeed, contain no features which obviously clash with 

his canons of taste. It may even be said that the ideals of some savages 

affect us more sympathetically than some of the ideals of our own mediaeval 

ancestors. As a matter of fact, European travelers in all parts of the 

world have met with women who were gracious and pleasant to look on, and 

not seldom even in the strict sense beautiful, from the standpoint of 

European standards. Such individuals have been found even among those 

races with the greatest notoriety for ugliness. 

 

Even among so primitive and remote a people as the Australians 

beauty in the European sense is sometimes found. "I have on two 

occasions," Lumholtz states, "seen what might be called beauties 

among the women of western Queensland. Their hands were small, 

their feet neat and well shaped, with so high an instep that one 

asked oneself involuntarily where in the world they had acquired 

this aristocratic mark of beauty. Their figure was above 

criticism, and their skin, as is usually the case among the young 

women, was as soft as velvet. When these black daughters of Eve 

smiled and showed their beautiful white teeth, and when their 

eyes peeped coquettishly from beneath the curly hair which hung 

in quite the modern fashion down their foreheads," Lumholtz 

realized that even here women could exert the influence ascribed 

by Goethe to women generally. (C. Lumholtz, _Among Cannibals_, p. 

132.) Much has, again, been written about the beauty of the 

American Indians. See, e.g., an article by Dr. Shufeldt, "Beauty 

from an Indian's Point of View," _Cosmopolitan Magazine_, April, 

1895. Among the Seminole Indians, especially, it is said that 

types of handsome and comely women are not uncommon. (_Clay_ 

MacCauley, "Seminole Indians of Florida," _Fifth Annual Report of 

the Bureau of Ethnology_, 1883-1884, pp. 493 et seq.) 

 

There is much even in the negress which appeals to the European 

as beautiful. "I have met many negresses," remarks Castellani 

(_Les Femmes au Congo_, p. 2), "who could say proudly in the 

words of the Song of Songs, 'I am black, but comely.' Many of our 

peasant women have neither the same grace nor the same delicate 


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