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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

skin as some natives of Cassai or Songha. As to color, I have 

seen on the African continent creatures of pale gold or even red 

copper whose fine and satiny skin rivals the most delicate white 

skins; one may, indeed, find beauties among women of the darkest 

ebony." He adds that, on the whole, there is no comparison with 

white women, and that the negress soon becomes hideous. 

 

The very numerous quotations from travelers concerning the women 

of all lands quoted by Ploss and Bartels (_Das Weib_, seventh 

edition, bd. i, pp. 88-106) amply suffice to show how frequently 

some degree of beauty is found even among the lowest human races. 

Cf., also, Mantegazza's survey of the women of different races 

from this point of view, _Fisiologia della Donna_, Cap. IV. 

 

The fact that the modern European, whose culture may be supposed to have 

made him especially sensitive to aesthetic beauty, is yet able to find 

beauty among even the women of savage races serves to illustrate the 

statement already made that, whatever modifying influences may have to be 

admitted, beauty is to a large extent an objective matter. The existence 

of this objective element in beauty is confirmed by the fact that it is 

sometimes found that the men of the lower races admire European women more 

than women of their own race. There is reason to believe that it is among 

the more intelligent men of lower race--that is to say those whose 

aesthetic feelings are more developed--that the admiration for white women 

is most likely to be found. 

 

"Mr. Winwood Reade," stated Darwin, "who has had ample 

opportunities for observation, not only with the negroes of the 

West Coast of Africa, but with those of the interior who have 

never associated with Europeans, is convinced that their ideas of 

beauty are, _on the whole_, the same as ours; and Dr. Rohlfs 

writes to me to the same effect with respect to Bornu and the 

countries inhabited by the Pullo tribes. Mr. Reade found that he 

agreed with the negroes in their estimation of the beauty of the 

native girls; and that their appreciation of the beauty of 

European women corresponded with ours.... The Fuegians, as I have 

been informed by a missionary who long resided with them, 

considered European women as extremely beautiful ... I should add 

that a most experienced observer, Captain [Sir R.] Burton, 

believes that a woman whom we consider beautiful is admired 

throughout the world." (Darwin, _Descent of Man_, Chapter XIX.) 

 

Mantegazza quotes a conversation between a South American chief 

and an Argentine who had asked him which he preferred, the women 

of his own people or Christian women; the chief replied that he 

admired Christian women most, and when asked the reason said that 

they were whiter and taller, had finer hair and smoother skin. 

(Mantegazza, _Fisiologia della Donna_, Appendix to Cap. VIII.) 


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