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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

Nordenskjoeld, as quoted by Ploss and Bartels, states that the 

Eskimo regard their own type as more ugly than that produced by 

crossing with white persons, and, according to Kropf, the Nosa 

Kaffers admire and seek the fairer half-castes in preference to 

their own women of pure race (Ploss and Bartels, _Das Weib_, 

seventh edition, bd. 1, p. 78). There is a widespread admiration 

for fairness, it may be added, among dark peoples. Fair men are 

admired by the Papuans at Torres Straits (_Reports of the 

Cambridge Anthropological Expedition_, vol. v, p. 327). The 

common use of powder among the women of dark-skinned peoples 

bears witness to the existence of the same ideal. 

 

Stratz, in his books _Die Schoenheit des Weiblichen Koerpers_ and 

_Die Rassenschoenheit des Weibes_, argues that the ideal of beauty 

is fundamentally the same throughout the world, and that the 

finest persons among the lower races admire and struggle to 

attain the type which is found commonly and in perfection among 

the white peoples of Europe. When in Japan he found that among 

the numerous photographs of Japanese beauties everywhere to be 

seen, his dragoman, a Japanese of low birth, selected as the most 

beautiful those which displayed markedly the Japanese type with 

narrow-slitted eyes and broad nose. When he sought the opinion of 

a Japanese photographer, who called himself an artist and had 

some claim to be so considered, the latter selected as most 

beautiful three Japanese girls who in Europe also would have been 

considered pretty. In Java, also, when selecting from a large 

number of Javanese girls a few suitable for photographing, Stratz 

was surprised to find that a Javanese doctor pointed out as most 

beautiful those which most closely corresponded to the European 

type. (Stratz, _Die Rassenschoenheit des Weibes_, fourth edition, 

1903, p. 3; id., _Die Koerperformen der Japaner_, 1904, p. 78.) 

 

Stratz reproduces (Rassenschoenheit, pp. 36 et seq.) a 

representation of Kwan-yin, the Chinese goddess of divine love, 

and quotes some remarks of Borel's concerning the wide deviation 

of the representations of the goddess, a type of gracious beauty, 

from the Chinese racial type. Stratz further reproduces the 

figure of a Buddhistic goddess from Java (now in the 

Archaeological Museum of Leyden) which represents a type of 

loveliness corresponding to the most refined and classic European 

ideal. 

 

Not only is there a fundamentally objective element in beauty throughout 

the human species, but it is probably a significant fact that we may find 

a similar element throughout the whole animated world. The things that to 

man are most beautiful throughout Nature are those that are intimately 

associated with, or dependent upon, the sexual process and the sexual 

instinct. This is the case in the plant world. It is so throughout most of 


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