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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the animal world, and, as Professor Poulton, in referring to this often 

unexplained and indeed unnoticed fact, remarks, "the song or plume which 

excites the mating impulse in the hen is also in a high proportion of 

cases most pleasing to man himself. And not only this, but in their past 

history, so far as it has been traced (e.g., in the development of the 

characteristic markings of the male peacock and argus pheasant), such 

features have gradually become more and more pleasing to us as they have 

acted as stronger and stronger stimuli to the hen."[133] 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[131] "It is likely that all visible parts of the organism, even those 

with a definite physiological meaning, appeal to the aesthetic sense of the 

opposite sex," Poulton remarks, speaking primarily of insects, in words 

that apply still more accurately to the human species. E. Poulton, _The 

Colors of Animals_, 1890, p. 304. 

 

[132] "The Arabs in general," Lane remarks, "entertain a prejudice against 

blue eyes--a prejudice said to have arisen from the great number of 

blue-eyed persons among certain of their northern enemies." 

 

[133] _Nature_, April 14, 1898, p. 55. 

 


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