Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

champion of this view, which undoubtedly embodies a large element of 

truth, although it must not be accepted to the absolute exclusion of the 

influence of sexual attractiveness. The two are largely woven in 

together.[138] 

 

There is, indeed, a general tendency for the sexual functions to take on a 

religious character and for the sexual organs to become sacred at a very 

early period in culture. Generation, the reproductive force in man, 

animals, and plants, was realized by primitive man to be a fact of the 

first magnitude, and he symbolized it in the sexual organs of man and 

woman, which thus attained to a solemnity which was entirely independent 

of purposes of sexual allurement. Phallus worship may almost be said to be 

a universal phenomenon; it is found even among races of high culture, 

among the Romans of the Empire and the Japanese to-day; it has, indeed, 

been thought by some that one of the origins of the cross is to be found 

in the phallus. 

 

"Hardly any other object," remarks Dr. Richard Andree, "has been 

with such great unanimity represented by nearly all peoples as 

the phallus, the symbol of procreative force in the religions of 

the East and an object of veneration at public festivals. In the 

Moabitic Baal Peor, in the cult of Dionysos, everywhere, indeed, 

except in Persia, we meet with Priapic representations and the 

veneration accorded to the generative organ. It is needless to 

refer to the great significance of the _Linga puja_, the 

procreative organ of the god Siva, in India, a god to whom more 

temples were erected than to any other Indian deity. Our museums 

amply show how common phallic representations are in Africa, East 

Asia, the Pacific, frequently in connection with religious 

worship." (R. Andree, "Amerikansche Phallus-Darstellungen," 

_Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1895, ht. 6, p. 678.) 

 

Women have no external generative organ like the phallus to play 

a large part in life as a sacred symbol. There is, however, some 

reason to believe that the triangle is to some extent such a 

symbol. Lejeune ("La Representation Sexuelle en Religion, Art, et 

Pedagogie," _Bulletin de la Societe d'Anthropologie_, Paris, 

October 3, 1901) brings forward reasons in favor of the view that 

the triangular hair-covered region of the mons veneris has had 

considerable significance in this respect, and he presents 

various primitive figures in illustration. 

 

Apart from the religions and magical properties so widely accorded to the 

primary sexual characters, there are other reasons why they should not 

often have gained or long retained any great importance as objects of 

sexual allurement. They are unnecessary and inconvenient for this purpose. 

The erect attitude of man gives them here, indeed, an advantage possessed 

by very few animals, among whom it happens with extreme rarity that the 

primary sexual characters are rendered attractive to the eye of the 


Page 4 from 7:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   7   Forward