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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

character of this gait makes it a method of sexual allurement. It should 

be observed that it rests on feminine anatomical characteristics, and that 

the natural walk of a femininely developed woman is inevitably different 

from that of a man. 

 

In an elaborate discussion of beauty of movement Stratz 

summarizes the special characters of the gait in woman as 

follows: "A woman's walk is chiefly distinguished from a man's by 

shorter steps, the more marked forward movement of the hips, the 

greater length of the phase of rest in relation to the phase of 

motion, and by the fact that the compensatory movements of the 

upper parts of the body are less powerfully supported by the 

action of the arms and more by the revolution of the flanks. A 

man's walk has a more pushing and active character, a woman's a 

more rolling and passive character; while a man seems to seek to 

catch his fleeing equilibrium, a woman seems to seek to preserve 

the equilibrium she has reached.... A woman's walk is beautiful 

when it shows the definitely feminine and rolling character, with 

the greatest predominance of the moment of extension over that of 

flexion." (Stratz, _Die Schoenheit des Weiblichen Koerpers_, 

fourteenth edition, p. 275.) 

 

An occasional development of the idea of sexual beauty as associated with 

developed hips is found in the tendency to regard the pregnant woman as 

the most beautiful type. Stratz observes that a woman artist once remarked 

to him that since motherhood is the final aim of woman, and a woman 

reaches her full flowering period in pregnancy, she ought to be most 

beautiful when pregnant. This is so, Stratz replied, if the period of her 

full physical bloom chances to correspond with the early months of 

pregnancy, for with the onset of pregnancy metabolism is heightened, the 

tissues become active, the tone of the skin softer and brighter, the 

breasts firmer, so that the charm of fullest bloom is increased until the 

moment when the expansion of the womb begins to destroy the harmony of the 

form. At one period of European culture, however,--at a moment and among a 

people not very sensitive to the most exquisite aesthetic sensations,--the 

ideal of beauty has even involved the character of advanced pregnancy. In 

northern Europe during the centuries immediately preceding the Renaissance 

the ideal of beauty, as we may see by the pictures of the time, was a 

pregnant woman, with protuberant abdomen and body more or less extended 

backward. This is notably apparent in the work of the Van Eycks: in the 

Eve in the Brussels Gallery; in the wife of Arnolfini in the highly 

finished portrait group in the National Gallery; even the virgins in the 

great masterpiece of the Van Eycks in the Cathedral at Ghent assume the 

type of the pregnant woman. 

 

"Through all the middle ages down to Duerer and Cranach," quite 

truly remarks Laura Marholm (as quoted by I. Bloch, _Beitraege zur 


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