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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

AEtiologie der Psychopathia Sexualis_, Teil I, p. 154), "we find a 

very peculiar type which has falsely been regarded as one of 

merely ascetic character. It represents quiet, peaceful, and 

cheerful faces, full of innocence; tall, slender, young figures; 

the shoulders still scanty; the breasts small, with slender legs 

beneath their garments; and round the upper part of the body 

clothing that is tight almost to the point of constriction. The 

waist comes just under the bosom, and from this point the broad 

skirts in folds give to the most feminine part of the feminine 

body full and absolutely unhampered power of movement and 

expansion. The womanly belly even in saints and virgins is very 

pronounced in the carriage of the body and clearly protuberant 

beneath the clothing. It is the maternal function, in sacred and 

profane figures alike, which marks the whole type--indeed, the 

whole conception--of woman." For a brief period this fashion 

reappeared in the eighteenth century, and women wore pads and 

other devices to increase the size of the abdomen. 

 

With the Renaissance this ideal of beauty disappeared from art. But in 

real life we still seem to trace its survival in the fashion for that 

class of garments which involved an immense amount of expansion below the 

waist and secured such expansion by the use of whalebone hoops and similar 

devices. The Elizabethan farthingale was such a garment. This was 

originally a Spanish invention, as indicated by the name (from 

_verdugardo_, provided with hoops), and reached England through France. We 

find the fashion at its most extreme point in the fashionable dress of 

Spain in the seventeenth century, such as it has been immortalized by 

Velasquez. In England hoops died out during the reign of George III but 

were revived for a time, half a century later, in the Victorian 

crinoline.[147] 

 

Only second to the pelvis and its integuments as a secondary sexual 

character in woman we must place the breasts.[148] Among barbarous and 

civilized peoples the beauty of the breast is usually highly esteemed. 

Among Europeans, indeed, the importance of this region is so highly 

esteemed that the general rule against the exposure of the body is in its 

favor abrogated, and the breasts are the only portion of the body, in the 

narrow sense, which a European lady in full dress is allowed more or less 

to uncover. Moreover, at various periods and notably in the eighteenth 

century, women naturally deficient in this respect have sometimes worn 

artificial busts made of wax. Savages, also, sometimes show admiration for 

this part of the body, and in the Papuan folk-tales, for instance, the 

sole distinguishing mark of a beautiful woman is breasts that stand 

up.[149] On the other hand, various savage peoples even appear to regard 

the development of the breasts as ugly and adopt devices for flattening 

this part of the body.[150] The feeling that prompts this practice is not 


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