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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

unknown in modern Europe, for the Bulgarians are said to regard developed 

breasts as ugly; in mediaeval Europe, indeed, the general ideal of feminine 

slenderness was opposed to developed breasts, and the garments tended to 

compress them. But in a very high degree of civilization this feeling is 

unknown, as, indeed, it is unknown to most barbarians, and the beauty of a 

woman's breasts, and of any natural or artificial object which suggests 

the gracious curves of the bosom, is a universal source of pleasure. 

 

The casual vision of a girl's breasts may, in the chastest youth, 

evoke a strange perturbation. (Cf., e.g., a passage in an early 

chapter of Marcelle Tinayre's _La Maison du Peche_.) We need not 

regard this feeling as of purely sexual origin; and in addition 

even to the aesthetic element it is probably founded to some 

extent on a reminiscence of the earliest associations of life. 

This element of early association was very well set forth long 

ago by Erasmus Darwin:-- 

 

"When the babe, soon after it is born into this cold world, is 

applied to its mother's bosom, its sense of perceiving warmth is 

first agreeably affected; next its sense of smell is delighted 

with the odor of her milk; then its taste is gratified by the 

flavor of it; afterward the appetites of hunger and of thirst 

afford pleasure by the possession of their object, and by the 

subsequent digestion of the aliment; and, last, the sense of 

touch is delighted by the softness and smoothness of the milky 

fountain, the source of such variety of happiness. 

 

"All these various kinds of pleasure at length become associated 

with the form of the mother's breast, which the infant embraces 

with its hands, presses with its lips, and watches with its eyes; 

and thus acquires more accurate ideas of the form of its mother's 

bosom than of the odor, flavor, and warmth which it perceives by 

its other senses. And hence at our maturer years, when any object 

of vision is presented to us which by its wavy or spiral lines 

bears any similitude to the form of the female bosom, whether it 

be found in a landscape with soft gradations of raising and 

descending surface, or in the forms of some antique vases, or in 

other works of the pencil or the chisel, we feel a general glow 

of delight which seems to influence all our senses; and if the 

object be not too large we experience an attraction to embrace it 

with our lips as we did in our early infancy the bosom of our 

mothers." (E. Darwin, _Zooenomia_, 1800, vol. i, p. 174.) 

 


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